Sessions with Handouts

Time Title Type Location

Sunday, June 30 - 12:30pm

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Occupy Día: Engaging Children to Social Justice Issues Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Children make sense and construct ideas of the world around them by observing, listening and interacting with their surrounding. They will see the world and treat others following judgments constructed by their experiences. The discussion of social justice issues will help children challenge and evaluate the way they see the world and interact with others. What better day than Día de los Niños/Día de los Libros (Children’s Day/Book Day) to advocate for a just and equitable society?

The celebration of Día emphasizes the importance of literacy of children of all linguistic and cultural background, which clearly represents the advocacy of social justice. Through “Occupy Día”, a series of bilingual and Spanish-language picture books will be recommended to incorporate the discussion of social justice issues such as immigration, gender roles, racism, social inequality, among others to Día programming. Activities incorporating the recommended titles are presented to engage children, family, friends, teachers, librarians and community members to the discussion of social justice issues.

Conference attendees will have the opportunity to know about Día and the importance of exposing children to social justice issues through literature and programming. The poster session will include pictures, narrative text, book exhibit and copies of an annotated bibliography of recommended titles.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Partnering with your community: DIY steps to construct a successful STEM curriculum center Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Less than 300 academic curriculum centers remain nationally. Of those remaining, many still struggle to remain relevant to their parent institutions and area communities. Teaching faculty from the Biology Department and Murphy Library at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse (UW-L), have collaborated since 2003 to revitalize the PK-12 Alice Hagar Curriculum Resource Center (AHCRC); specifically in the area of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Poster presenter will outline his methods, provide a short overview of this popular collection, elaborate on collection breadth/depth, and discuss useful strategies on using award winning materials in the same manner as done at Murphy Library’s annual “Teacher Resource Day.” Piloted in April 2007, Teacher Resource Day is an event held for area PK-12 teachers, reading specialists, special education teachers, library media center specialists, and local public librarians a chance both to peruse the latest quality, non-fiction STEM and Social Studies trade books, DVD’s, etc. and to explore UW-L's STEM website, which provides supporting materials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Secondary Marketing Research Certificate: Collaboration with Marketing Faculty and the College of Business Administration Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The Secondary Marketing Research Certificate (SMRC) program is collaboration among the University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries, College of Business administration, Center for Professional Development, and the Department of Marketing faculty. It was inspired by the Business Research Essentials program at Goizueta Business School at Emory University and the need to reach out to 5600 business students at UTSA. According to an internal survey of 80 graduating students in Fall 2010, less than 40% used an online business database. With strong support of COB administration, since Fall 2011, business students in the introductory marketing research course can earn a Secondary Marketing Research Certificate which may be showcased on their resumes. SMRC is a four-module online tutorial fully embedded in Blackboard introducing students to company and industry research, market research databases, and consumer demographics and psychographics. Each module consists of a series of videos, extended transcripts, online activities where students can get hands-on experience, and a quiz. Those students who complete all four modules, pass four quizzes with 80% or above, and submit an online survey with their feedback are eligible to receive a Certificate of Completion in Secondary Marketing Research signed by Deans of the College of Business and Libraries. SMRC tutorial constitutes 5% of the grade. Upon completion of each semester, the tutorial is revised and updated based on the students and faculty’s feedback, and changes to the resource interfaces.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
The Frugal Liaison Librarian: Building Virtually Free Subject Area Expertise Though Social Media Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Rising costs and decreased funding have increased the need for academic subject librarians to find affordable continuing education opportunities. This poster session will present the results of a study conducted to examine whether information obtained from free social media web sites can be effectively used in lieu of traditional fee-based methods such as association membership and conference attendance. In conducting this study the researchers will examine the social media presence of 50 scholarly associations across 10 broad subject areas to determine whether Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube can help subject librarians stay current in the disciplines and academic departments to which they are assigned or embedded. The success of the study will be determined by the quantity and perceived value of the information obtained from the social media sites, which will be examined in five main areas: subject knowledge procurement, collection development, emerging trends in the discipline, new technologies and research tools, and pedagogy. An explanation of the study, including research methods, examples of relevant posts, results in the form of graphs, and a brief discussion and conclusion will be displayed on the poster. The session will be most useful to academic subject librarians, but will also be beneficial to librarians who serve subject specific patrons at either public or special libraries.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Writers Need Libraries too: Spotlighting Library Resources for Today’s Busy Academic Writers Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Traditionally, student research writers utilize their academic libraries to read and review the literature, but may overlook important writing resources, as evidenced by an ongoing collaboration between a writing instructor and academic librarians at a leading research university .The UAB Graduate School offers professional development courses, several of which focus on writing and publication, including “Professional Writing & Publishing” and “Writing a Journal Article in 12 Weeks.” Observing students’ lack of awareness of library resources, the writing instructor sought guidance on how to help students identify the best publications to which to submit their scholarly work. Over the course of several semesters, librarian-led instruction sessions helped student writers make more informed choices about where to publish. Handouts laid out the most suitable tools to evaluate and compare publications, to choose between open access and traditionally published journals, and to understand journal metrics. Initial responses were positive, indicating that the students appreciated learning about writers’ resources. During the spring 2013, the team will improve handouts, create a LibGuide, and administer pre- and post- surveys to assess the needs of nascent academic writers and the effectiveness of the instruction session and materials. These assessments, as well as instructional materials samples and LibGuide screen shots, will be shared at the poster session. Through this synergistic collaboration between the graduate school and the academic libraries, student writers can start to build publishing track records, boost research productivity, and better prepare for job searches and professional careers.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Sunday, June 30 - 1:00pm

1:00pm - 2:30pm
All the News That’s Fit to Teach: News Literacy Instruction (ACRL IS) Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S401
Description :

Nationally, there is growing awareness of the need to educate young adults in news literacy, the ability to think critically about print, broadcast, and online news. The News Literacy Project sponsors outcomes-based research in best practices; however, few libraries have news literacy programs and the topic remains under represented in our professional literature. This program features an invited speaker involved in news literacy research, followed by librarian-led lightning talks on successful news literacy instructional programs.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Bridging the Digital Divide: Technology and Information Access in Africa Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S103bc
Description :

Technology has brought changes in library service delivery, and the Internet has become the dominant mode of information exchange in libraries. New opportunities for collecting, organizing, disseminating local content and providing access to remotely distributed resources have emerged. In Africa this transformation has been slow due to the digital divide. There are some efforts ongoing to close the gap. This panel presentation will describe technology initiatives in African libraries and provide insights to the challenges encountered in efforts to utilize technology to enhance services. Panelists will discuss digitization projects, institutional repositories, resource sharing, Internet connectivity and other technologies.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Business Reference Sources Committee Publishers' Forum (RUSA_BRASS) Forum/Update McCormick Place Convention Center
N227a
Description :

Finding Business Information in a Googlized World: The Future of Business Research and Discovery Layers--What is the impact of discovery services on business information? How are discovery services affecting business publishers, particularly on the specialized business databases side? Most of the discovery platforms tend to be focused on articles, not pulling out data that business researchers seek. Discovery Services product managers from ProQuest, OCLC, and EBSCO will speak and answer questions about their plans for partnering with the vendors of more specialized company, industry, financial, and market research databases.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Dance Librarians Discussion Group, Part I Discussion/Interest group McCormick Place Convention Center
N133
Description :

n/a

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Lessons for the Librarian: 10 Tips for Teaching the One-Shot Instruction Session (ACRL) Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S405
Description :

Academic librarians teach every day. They teach diverse audiences in a variety of venues, but one teaching scenario remains quintessential: the one-shot library instruction session. In recognition of the centrality of the “one-shot,” this panel shares time-tested “lessons” for librarians that teach in this format. These lessons provide a range of strategies for developing pedagogically sound one-shot library instruction sessions and can be grouped loosely into three categories: planning, delivery, and integration.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
New Pew Research: Libraries + Parents = Innovation and Success Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S103d
Description :

New Pew Internet Project findings show that nearly 95% of American parents say libraries are important for their children, and they are more likely than others to be interested in libraries adding future tech-related services. Join Pew’s Lee Rainie, Deborah Jacobs from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and others to learn about the research and how these power users can help libraries develop and advocate for innovative services that support children, families, and communities.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
1:00pm - 2:30pm
Usability, the User Experience & Interface Design: The Role of Reference Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S403
Description :

With the advent of new discovery tools and new technology, the habits of our researchers and users have certainly changed. How are we collecting data and observing behavior to improve these interfaces to better meet our user's needs? How can we learn from what other researchers are studying and use that data to implement change? What is the new relationship between the virtual space, the physical space, and the user experience?

Panel members will discuss how their institutions have implemented innovative changes to the user interface and address the role of usability testing in their decision process. Audience members will have opportunities to submit questions to the panelists. The learning objectives for attendees are:

==Increased understanding of changes in users’ research habits;
==Introduction to methods of information/data collection beyond traditional usability studies;
==Learn processes for implementing change relevant for their own institutions.

**Selected as a conference "top pick" by Library Journal!**

1:00pm - 4:00pm
2014 Notable Children's Books Committee Meeting III (ALSC) Other Hilton Chicago
Waldorf Room
Description :

The Notable Children's Books Committee will be preparing to evaluate books published in 2013 for the 2014 Notable Children's Books list.

Sunday, June 30 - 2:30pm

2:30pm - 4:00pm
3D Printing: A New Dimension in Service Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

3D printing is a technology that brings three-dimensional computer models to life as a tangible physical object. Recent reductions in the cost of this technology have made it a hot topic for DIYers and the “maker movement.” In an academic library, it is apparent that disciplines as wide-ranging as Art & Design, Business, Engineering, and many more can make use of this technology as a tool for creation, prototyping, modeling, and other activities and research limited only by imagination. The library has always been a center for gathering, processing, and transforming information and thus is the natural home for a service that facilitates creation and sharing of information in ways not previously available.

Since launching a 3D printing service in September 2012, Lovejoy Library has seen interest from students and faculty in several disciplines. Usage statistics and feedback from users have been collected, and web statistics for the service’s web pages indicate even more interest than can be seen in the usage statistics. A survey is being developed to collect additional information from potential users to investigate the discrepancy, and ongoing improvements to the service are planned.

This poster session will describe - through photos, printed material, and physical display - Lovejoy Library’s implementation of the service and the equipment and software involved. Examples of printed objects will also be available for display and examination.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Are Academic Health Science Library Facebook Pages Self-Serving? Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This analysis uncovers trends in Facebook page engagement to help academic health science libraries better manage their Facebook presence. Publicly available data from Facebook and library websites is collected and analyzed to measure fan engagement with academic health science library Facebook pages. Ten active Facebook pages from east coast members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) are examined for likes, comments and repost activity for the month of October 2012. Interaction with the library Facebook page by librarian and library staff are compared to interactions by the patron community in order to determine if there are patterns of frequency of engagement with library Facebook pages.

The researchers identify those who interact with posts during the month and cross-reference the information with library staff directories to determine if health science library Facebook pages are self-serving to librarians and library staff. Additionally, this information is analyzed to reveal the post types most frequently interacted with by library staff versus patrons. Graphs are used to convey statistical information and trends, interesting page posts and comments are anonymously highlighted, and an iPad slideshow of example posts from the various library Facebook pages examined is included during the presentation.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Building Financial Literacy Reference Skills Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster session will demonstrate the training methodology NYPL has developed in conjunction with financial experts to increase the financial education awareness among library staff and users. We will present the programmatic goals of the Money Matters Training Program that educate staff on core concepts of financial education and related reference sources. The program launched in February 2012 and the evaluative data collected indicates that staff members who participated in the program increased their comfort level in providing reference services in financial education, focusing on areas such as banking, credit, identity theft, and investing . The program also equips our staff with information about how to conduct financial education training in their communities. Visitors to our poster session will leave with access to a complete staff training curriculum including trainer’s guides, participant worksheets, ppt. presentations, and online e-learning modules that can be used to seamlessly replicate the Money Matters Pro financial literacy training at their own libraries. During the poster session we will present the Money Matters Pro website, clips of training classes, success stories, and samples of the training materials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Connecting the Dots: Defining Scholarly Services in a Research Lifecycle Model Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Librarians at the University of Central Florida (UCF) Libraries have created a visual model depicting the cycle of research at an institutional level while embedding scholarly services into the flow. The Research Lifecycle is used as a basis to build a framework for the faculty research process and gain both support and funding for new infrastructure and services.

The UCF Research Lifecycle includes four sub-cycles: a planning cycle, a project cycle, a publication cycle and the 21st century digital scholarship cycle. In each cycle, supporting services are added to the research flow. Amid the existing services provided by different university units, potential services are added to bridge the missing links in the lifecycle. Some of these missing services include data hosting, research computing and an institutional repository. The center of each cycle shows corresponding activities related to sponsored or grant-funded research, which form an important part of the institution’s scholarly research activities.

This project was initiated by the university library’s Scholarly Communication Task force. During its development, librarians collaborated with other campus departments, including the Office of Research and Commercialization, the Institute for Simulation and Training, and the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning. The lifecycle graphic and its related services are available at: http://library.ucf.edu/scholarlycommunication. Taskforce members also solicited feedback from teaching faculty, which yielded a wide variety of constructive comments and were incorporated into the model. The lifecycle at its current state has received widespread campus attention and generated interest from University administrators.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Developing Makerspace Culture Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Defined as groups of creators who come together to design, plan, and create products using both digital and non-digital tools, makerspaces are popping up in library-centered conversations. While makerspaces can include cutting-edge technology, it takes more than 3D printers, computers, and robotics equipment to define them. It is the underlying non-competitive support and collaboration community that truly convert an activity into a makerspace. Ito et al (2013) define “connected learning” as “broadened access to learning that is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward educational, economic, or political opportunity” (p. 4). Makerspaces in libraries are an avenue to connected learning. A middle school librarian, iSchool faculty member, graduate student mentors, and middle school students have co-developed a culture of inquiry while experimenting with computer programming, circuitry, prototyping, and design. Our collaborative work has profoundly impacted us, and we hope that others will be similarly influenced by the power of participatory learning (Jenkins et al 2009) in action. Through video and photographs of our activity, as well as a resource list, we hope to immerse visitors in the spirit and activities of a makerspace.

References

Ito, Mizuko, et al, 2013. Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Retrieved January 15, 2013, from http://dmlhub.net/sites/default/files/ConnectedLearning_report.pdf.

Jenkins, Henry, et al, 2009. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Leading Innovation: Los Angeles Public Library’s Residency Program Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Although most post-MLIS residency programs (i.e., apprenticeships) are associated with academic libraries, the Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) recently conducted a 6-month pilot project to test the various elements contributing to a successful public library residency. The Innovation Leadership Program (ILP) pilot paired 2 recent MLIS graduates (Residents) with 2 seasoned LAPL middle managers (Fellows), who mentored the Residents as they experienced the challenges and joys of working in a large metropolitan public library. Not only did both the Residents and Fellows conclusively demonstrate a growth in confidence and project management skills, the former Fellows have now been promoted to positions of greater responsibility. In addition, the Residents have continued to work at LAPL. The pilot was, in fact, so successful that its findings were used to inform and justify the creation of a two-year residency, which launched in January 2013.

Our poster will describe: (1) the elements of a successful residency; (2) how those elements were implemented and tested at LAPL; and (3) the results of the pilot. We will also provide a progress report on the first six months of the two-year ILP residency. The current ILP project manager (Jene Brown), ILP Residents (Mary Abler and Jacqueline Welsh), and LAPL Fellows (Joyce Cooper and Karen Pickard-Four) will be on hand (as available) to discuss their experience.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Marketing an Established Institutional Repository Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster illustrates the planning of a strategic marketing campaign for Marquette University's institutional repository, E-Publications@Marquette. The IR was established in 2008 for the deposit of theses and dissertations and has expanded to include faculty publications and research. Despite active participation by some faculty, universal participation remains an elusive goal. The Coordinators of Digital Programs and Marketing and Outreach collaborated to better promote the services and capabilities of the IR.

This process involved the identification of faculty participation and needs as well as an assessment of the IR’s capabilities in addressing those needs. Faculty participation was identified through the faculty permissions database, providing an accurate number of faculty contributors. A needs assessment survey was sent to Marquette University faculty, identifying areas of potential growth. Consideration was given to the IR’s ability to meet the identified needs. Equipment, staffing, software, and other resources were evaluated. Based upon the assessment survey and the IR’s available resources, planning for a promotional plan and the evaluation of its effectiveness can then occur.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

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