Sessions with Handouts

Time Title Type Location

Saturday, June 29 - 12:30pm

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Visualize, Innovate, Create: Graphic Inquiry Across the Curriculum Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Photos, graphic organizers, maps, and more… address the AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner and promote information fluency through technology-rich, graphic inquiry projects that enhance content-area learning. Graphic inquiry involves weaving visual representations throughout the inquiry process.

This poster is intended to provide a practical approach to incorporating graphic inquiry across the curriculum. Specifically, it is designed to help the school librarians identify tools and techniques for using graphic inquiry with their students. This visually rich poster provides numerous, standards-based inquiry activities and projects that incorporate traditional materials as well as emerging social and collaborative technologies.

The poster is divided into three sections: visualize, innovate, and create. (1) Visualize through Graphic Tools and Learning Tasks including organizers, maps, images and symbols, diagrams & illustrations, and charts & graphs. (2) Innovate through Graphic Inquiry Elements. Explore five elements of graphic inquiry including questioning, exploration, assimilation, inferences, and reflection. (3) Create through Meaningful, Standards-based Processes and Products. Explore seven graphic-rich ways students can share their understandings through SCORE IT! (storytelling, communication, organization, representation, evidence, inference, and teaching).

The poster will include specific, real-world examples based on research conducted in the development of my new book titled Graphic Inquiry by Annette Lamb and Danny Callison.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
“They Already Know This, Don’t They???” Assessing and Planning an Information Literacy Session for History Graduate Students Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Learn how the creation of a graduate level history research methodologies class allowed for an open and honest discussion of faculty perceptions of their students research skills, as well as the collaborative development of an assessment instrument tool whose results were used to then plan an information literacy session for the students.

When one university history’s department endeavored to create a graduate level research methodologies class, part of the curricular discussion centered around whether or not student’s required information literacy instruction. Faculty held a number of opinions about the level of their student’s information skills, and the committee providing feedback on course development actually split on whether a library session was even necessary. Those advocating a library instruction session were unable to agree on what should be covered. The history faculty member piloting the first class, Instruction Coordinator, and History Library Liaison, talked extensively about how to assess student skills. Together, they developed an authentic survey instrument, based on actual research tasks and knowledge sets, mapped to specific ACRL Information Literacy Learning Outcomes, Performance Indicators and Outcomes. Once students completed the assessment, the results were analyzed and used to craft a subsequent library session. The poster presentation will detail this collaborative process from start to finish, and share faculty perceptions, the assessment tool, results, and lessons learned.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 1:00pm

1:00pm - 2:30pm
DIY Video Creation Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S103a
Description :

Children and families are increasingly online. Our libraries have the opportunity to reinforce the storytime environment and demonstrate early literacy skills using online videos! Join representatives from King County Library System and Washington County Cooperative Library Services as they demonstrate filming, editing and uploading videos right before your eyes. You will discover a variety of video and editing tools and learn how to incorporate online video into your library’s early literacy offerings. You will see: Flip Camera, Zoom Q3HD Camera, Final CutX editing software, Windows Movie Maker, YouTube and MediaWiki.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Dynamic Duos: Building and Sustaining Public and School Library Connections Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102bc
Description :

Collaboration between school and public libraries through programming and collection development offer great benefits for students of all ages and their families. But how do busy librarians develop and maintain these connections and create sustainable partnerships? Four librarians will share their knowledge of successful collaborative experiences including "how to" advice about connecting library science students with schools, public libraries, and museums; an effective outreach model that simulates public library services to middle and high school students by offering dynamic programming and circulation services in their school lunchroom; strategies for sustaining literacy connections between the school library and the public library year-round; and specific recommendations for organizing a series of annual class visits to the public library.

Presenters: Abby Harwood, Teen Services Librarian, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh; Elizabeth Pollicino Murphy, Director, Callahan Library, St. Joseph's College, NY; Janet Amann, Assistant Professor, Library Science, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire; Martha Simpson, Head of Children’s Services, Stratford Library Association, Stratford, CT

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Value Enhanced: Reimagining a Philosophy of Excellence (ACRL CLS) Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S403
Description :

Small college libraries rock! Listen to ACRL Excellence in Academic Libraries awardees share nimble, flexible, and courageous approaches to the challenges we all face. Learn how each of these college libraries has used recognition for past practices to inform future directions. College library directors and staff will showcase initiatives that not only respond to their institutions’ needs, but also demonstrate a significant voice in the conversation about the value of libraries in higher education.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
What's Hot in STEAM Education: How Using ECRR2 Supports Literacy, Common Core and School Success Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S501bcd
Description :

What is the latest research on STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math)? What is the early learning relevance and what are the common core connections? How does Every Child Ready to Read fit in to this picture? Dr. Judy Cheatham, VP of Literacy Services for Reading is Fundamental will discuss these issues and a panel of librarians will share their real experiences with STEAM and ECRR's curriculum.

1:00pm - 4:00pm
2014 Notable Children's Books Committee Meeting II (ALSC) Other Hilton Chicago
Waldorf Room
Description :

The Notable Children's Books Committee will be preparing to evaluate books published in 2013 for the 2014 Notable Children's Books list.

Saturday, June 29 - 1:30pm

1:30pm - 2:15pm
Conversation Starters: Idaho Maker Spaces - Engaging Teens with STEM Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102d
Description :

Thought about starting a Maker Space in your library? Idaho has joined the Maker Movement by launching Maker Spaces in five public libraries across the state.

The State Library has implemented a pilot project that includes training on tools and technology, leveraging partnerships, involving community, and evaluating outcomes.

The results include formal and stealth programming which incorporate engineering, robotics, and other STEM topics to draw teens into these innovative spaces!

Come hear what Idaho is doing, what we are learning, and what's next.

There will be time for discussion, questions, and sharing.

The pilot project is initially focusing on engaging teens through Maker Spaces, but our goal is that these spaces will be available to the entire community.

The libraries in the pilot project represent diverse geographic regions as well as rural and urban communities.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 2:30pm

2:30pm - 4:00pm
All work and no play: New Reference Librarians and Stress Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

There is no one size fits all explanation the stress factors that affect everyone, but there is one guarantee, being the new person is stressful. From the perspective of a new librarian, this poster will cover factors that cause stress for a new reference librarian. For a new reference librarian there are some universal factors that most people relate to such as homesickness and workplace dynamics. However, there are also some factors that rely heavily on the type of person; for example within the context of a reference librarian’s position responsibilities there room for a person’s self-doubt about their performance and stress caused by over-empathizing with library users. The primary stressors explored in this poster, based upon the presenter’s experiences and the research, is job relocation stress, new work culture stress, self-expectation stress, and crossover stress. Proposed coping mechanisms for each of these stressors will also be recommended.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Connected Kids: Technology Programs to Inspire Creative Exploration Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Learn how technology serves as an important tool to generate new programs that enable children to share stories and create media while in an informal learning environment. These programs give children the opportunity to explore their interests, allowing them to have fun and freely experiment without the boundaries of an assignment. Programs range in complexity from simple - light painting & animated storytelling - to more complex - Scratch & Mindstorms. The success of a program is evident through the registration statistics and patron feedback. Additionally, the paintings, movies, and stories created are all posted on the Barrington Area Library "tech” blog. The participants’ willingness to visit the blog after the program can be quantified through web analytics, thus measuring, in part, the emotional investment and pride they feel for their finished product. Through demonstration and examples, librarians from the Barrington Area Library will share the ideas and techniques that have made their programs successful.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Cyber Seniors: More Options for Lifelong Learning Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Research shows lifelong learning is vitally important in the Athens, GA area. National publications recognize this as an ideal place to retire because of educational and cultural opportunities. The demographics show an 18% Baby Boomer population growing.
How does technology change the way Baby Boomers and other older adults participate in library/museum sponsored life-long learning programs?
Partners, Athens Clarke County Library and Lyndon House Arts Center, explored this question in an IMLS National Leadership Grant, The Boomers: Reflecting, Sharing, Learning.
Project highlights include:
• Programs attended in three ways: traditional onsite audience, online webinar-style, and 24/7 access to the archived programs from the project website.
• A website to promote and archive programs, http://boomersinathens.org
• A 12 member “Baby Boomer” advisory board to guide the project and create programming.
• Community Snapshots, including Vietnam Veteran interviews, suggested and created by area baby boomers and other older adults.
• Yearly community-wide events and exhibitions on themes popular with area baby boomers.
• Professional evaluator to collect audience responses, observe, and write evaluation reports.
The ALA poster session will provide photos from the variety of programs, events and exhibitions; graphs comparing modes of attendance and other findings; sample evaluation forms, and a live tour of the website.
Evaluation is conducted regularly by assessment professional, Dr. Dottie Harnish, who reports findings quarterly using statistics and informal survey results.

Interests :
Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Getting Undergrads into the Archives: Innovative Outreach at SUNY Potsdam Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The State University of New York (SUNY) at Potsdam prides itself on providing research opportunities to its undergraduates, yet very few students take advantage of the incredible resources available in the College Archives and Special Collections. This lack of awareness has also created a significant gap in archived student group records. In an effort to increase undergraduate usage and awareness, the archivist and outreach librarian teamed up to create a targeted, yearlong promotional campaign that includes a new Undergraduate Archives Research Award; two events that encourage student groups to donate their records while exposing them to archival holdings; and increased visibility of research material through physical displays and social media outlets. While evaluation will not be complete until May 2013, early projections indicate a measurable increase in undergraduate use of the archives. Assessment data will include statistics on event attendance, Research Award submissions, and social media response, as well as a survey distributed to students who used the archives during the 2012-2013 academic year. The poster itself has two aims. First, to document and share innovative outreach ideas by exhibiting photographs of the events and displays, examples of print and online publicity materials, and an excerpt of the winning Undergraduate Archives Research Award submission. Second, to clearly demonstrate the campaign’s success by presenting quantitative data and qualitative survey responses in a visually compelling way. This project will also be submitted as a presentation for the annual SUNY Librarian’s Association conference in June 2013.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Going "Slow:" Leading the Slow Books Movement at an Academic Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In a March 23, 2012 blog post on The Atlantic website, author Maura Kelly argues for a new “slow” movement, the “Slow Books Movement.” Not unlike the Slow Foods’ call for a more healthful, substantive diet, the Slow Books Movement challenges readers to choose more substantive reading material—serious literature that encourages quiet contemplation and that broadens self-awareness. Slow Books is neither an alarmist reaction to technology nor a nostalgic longing for the past—meaningful works of literature exist whether in electronic or print formats. Rather, the point of slow reading is simply to challenge minds and stimulate reflection. Academic libraries, as repositories of the literary printed (and digital) word, are perfectly positioned to lead this movement. By embracing a reader’s advisory role, academic librarians can help create new readers, inspire existing readers, and build literary communities. This poster demonstrates how one academic librarian is engaging students through blogging, book clubs, and reader’s advisory in order to promote slow reading on campus. Outreach strategies and evaluation methods (including analytics, surveys, and user feedback) are explained step-by-step so that librarians can apply these findings and implement these programs and practices on their own campuses.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Many Books, Many Communities: How Choose to Read Ohio Encourages Ohioans to “Read Together, Read Ohio, Read for Life” Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

A statewide reading initiative for all ages, Choose to Read Ohio (CTRO) encourages libraries, schools, families, and others to build a community of readers and an appreciation of Ohio authors and literature. Every two years, with the input of dozens of librarians and educators, CTRO selects and promotes a booklist of 15-20 exemplary titles by authors native to or resident of Ohio. A companion reader’s toolkit is created for each book. Toolkits include discussion questions, extension projects (developed in light of academic content standards and 21st Century Skills), and activities suitable for library programming, classroom adoption, or family or book group use. The poster session features sample toolkits (available for attendees to take), CTRO author READ posters and other marketing items, and photos and evaluation information from creative CTRO projects produced by public, school, and academic libraries. CTRO was established with an eye toward One Book, One Community and other large-scale reading programs, but rather than featuring a single title, CTRO was developed to be highly adaptable, to provide a selection of books and resources for any group from a small book club to a school district or city, and to communicate the breadth of Ohio literature. CTRO is a project of the State Library of Ohio, Ohioana Library Association, Ohio Center for the Book, and other partners. It may be a model for local, regional, or state campaigns in support of collaboration, exploration, and the joy of reading and sharing books.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Peripatetic Librarians at a Community College Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Reference librarians have been roving amongst patrons for decades. With the advent of tablet PCs, librarians are now I-Roving, improving services and marketing. However, little data exists on I-Roving at community colleges.

Kennedy King College piloted an I-Roving study in Fall 2012. It involved having each reference librarian rove several hours per week with an I-Pad, collecting data on patron interactions, surveying students on their opinions of I-Roving, and writing personal reflections on I-Roving. Patrons overwhelmingly supported the I-Roving librarian model, and the librarians wrote positive reflections as well. Data collected showed a marked increase in interactions between librarians and patrons, when compared with past reference data.

Since the initial data collection, the library obtained new roving tablet PCs, and looks to expand its services outside of the library, sending a roving librarian to writing labs. In the works is an online information literacy liaison program, to reach out to digital student patrons. The library must also embrace an open mindset toward adapting to new augmented reality devices like Google Glasses as they make their way into the mainstream.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities: What Librarians Really Need to be Successful at the Reference Desk Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Librarians at a joint academic/public library are using reference statistical software to record transactions at the merged reference desk. The software program allows libraries to easily compile and report on reference transaction data. Aggregated and analyzed reference transactions for a period of one year will be presented. The data demonstrates the needs of the patrons from this merged library and conversely indicates what proficiencies and capabilities are required from employees. Visuals will include examples from the software program, employee entries, and essential library tasks.
This presentation will demonstrate the types of information that can be gained from using a reference tracking system. Understanding the nature of the questions being answered at the desk will enable libraries to identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities that all reference providers should demonstrate. Maintaining and analyzing reference statistics will allow libraries to better train, support, and mentor developing reference professionals.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Returning to Learn: Research and the Prodigal Student Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Returning students - those with a significant lapse in time during their formal education - make up a large and growing percentage of the student population at Portland State University (PSU). Over 40% of PSU undergraduates are over 26 years of age and 21% of graduate students over 39. Given returning students’ experiences in the work force, motivations for learning, and the lapse of time since conducting academic research, returning students may approach research differently than traditional students. Despite the size of this student population at PSU and the growth of the returning student demographic in higher education, very little research has been conducted regarding this demographic’s research habits and skills.

Over the course of two academic quarters, three librarians from Portland State University conducted an ethnographic study of returning students’ research habits. Librarians collected data using direct observation, research journals, photo diaries, focus groups, surveys and semi-structured interviews. The goals of this research were to describe returning students’ research habits and to identify potential improvements to library services and instruction for returning students at PSU.

Returning to Learn: Research and the Prodigal Student will present the study’s initial findings, outline recommendations resulting from the research, and identify further research opportunities regarding this unique and growing student population. These findings will allow other academic libraries to learn about returning students’ research habits, and help them to identify potential changes in or additions to library services for this student population.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Technology Literacy Course: a little TLC goes a long way Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Technology Literacy Course: a little TLC goes a long way

The basis of this poster session is a short, online seminar titled, TLC. Targeting library paraprofessionals and staff of small libraries primarily in rural, isolated settings, is a two part library training seminar focused on basic technology literacy. The aim is to reach those who may lack opportunity for specialized training and collaboration about technology. Enlightenment, inspiration, and raising awareness to an often underrepresented group is the endeavor. The goal is to help empower library staffs at this level to best model technology literacy skills. After all, library employees are in an ideal position to have and share a small amount of technological knowledge with users. The basic format of this seminar is interactive and in order to reach as many remote areas as possible in the vast West Texas landscape, it will also be offered both online and face-to-face. PowerPoint slides will be accompanied by text with a mixture of pertinent tables, graphs, and photographs. Two 60 minute live sessions will be offered to attendees in the synchronous webinar format.

Covered in the TLC seminar are the basics of computer operating systems, browsers, applications, add-ons, extensions, and plugins. A section on computer security and personal identity safety is also included. Mobility and cloud computing finalize the last session. Each section will conclude with exercises and an opportunity for questions and answers, as well as a
true/false evaluation form with a space for comments and questions.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
The Power of Crowdsourcing: A Use Case from the Biodiversity Heritage Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

How can a library with limited staff efficiently improve the discoverability and interoperability of digital assets? Answer: Crowdsource metadata enhancement! The Biodiversity Heritage Library, an open access digital library consortium, utilizes Flickr to provide access to over 60,000 images extracted from its digital collections. While bibliographic metadata is associated with these images at the time of upload to Flickr, identification of the species illustrated within each image is absent. Without these identifications, users are unable to efficiently search within image collections. Crowdsourcing offers a promising solution.

BHL staff have hosted two Flickr Tagging Parties at the Smithsonian. With guidance from BHL staff, nearly 40 Smithsonian staff added species name tags to 448 images in the BHL Flickr, resulting in a 53% increase in the number of monthly images typically tagged and a 97% increase in monthly images shared with external databases. This success has prompted BHL staff to develop formal instructional material and organize public crowdsourcing events. Not only does the tagging of images provide discoverability in BHL Flickr, but the images that are tagged are also automatically added to the Encyclopedia of Life, providing a “two birds, one stone” scenario.

Through the use of workflow diagrams, “before and after” examples, and graphs demonstrating project successes, this poster will outline the strategies employed to direct crowdsourced metadata enhancement activities. The principles guiding BHL crowdsourcing activities can be adopted by any library seeking creative ways to improve the relevance of their resources in an increasingly digital world.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
The Teens in the Back of the Library: School Libraries as “Third Place” for Marginalized Teens Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Every librarian has a story of the teens who come in and lurk in the back of their library. Who are those teens and why are they choosing the library as a refuge?
This research study uses Third Place to examine how school libraries create a community for teens. Third Place, an idea popularized by sociologist Ray Oldenberg in his book, The Great Good Place, theorizes that healthy communities have places outside of work and home to socialize and develop community. Third Place has been examined in numerous contexts, including libraries, but rarely in the context of children, teens or schools.
Through interviews with school librarians, the study examines which “Third Place” qualities are exemplified in their spaces, what policies on both the school and library level foster a “Third Place,” and which communities of teens are regulars. Preliminary research suggests that teens marginalized in the larger school community seek out the library as either a longer-term community or as short-term sanctuary to ride out socio-emotional upheaval. This data will be represented through charts, graphs and images of key qualities.
School librarians from a range of schools - public and private, affluent and high poverty, urban, suburban and rural, and middle and high school - have been interviewed to determine commonalities and differences relating to the Third Place theory. Best practices are extrapolated from the data to encourage librarians who want to create a “Third Place” in their spaces.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

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