Sessions with Handouts

Time Title Type Location

Saturday, June 29 - 10:30am

10:30am - 12:00pm
Archives 2.0: If You Like It Then You Should Put a Pin On It Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As part of an academic library, special collections departments serve several populations: undergraduates, graduate students, researchers, and public users. One of their main points of emphasis is to explore new ways to engage users and promote rare books and localized collections. In order to determine if using social media could increase the awareness and usage of special collections materials, the University of Tennessee recently uploaded content into two platforms: Pinterest and HistoryPin.
HistoryPin and Pinterest were chosen because they are established platforms that provide familiar user experiences in terms of searching, sharing, and interacting with content. They also allow libraries to expose materials and deliver services to users outside of library instruction and traditional outreach activities. In order to measure success, Google Analytics and built-in statistical tools from Pinterest and HistoryPin were used to generate data on usage and collection access.
This poster will provide data that demonstrates the value of using social media applications to promote and increase the usage of digital special collections material. Its findings are important because there is limited research on whether – and how – social platforms affect access to and discovery of digital collections. The presenters will also have tablets on hand for a real-time demonstration of the technical tools used in the study.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Blossoming the STEM: Libraries working as STEM education partners Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Library faculty at the University of Memphis have recently become very involved in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. To acquaint ALA attendees of ways the library can partner in this field, the poster will first define STEM and list its areas of academic study, federal agencies, and corporate supporters. A second column will list ways that public, school, and academic libraries have successively collaborated throughout the country based on library literature.
Finally, graphs and statistics will make up the final third related to an ongoing project that is investigating the publications by STEM faculty at this institution over the last 5 years to determine if the authors acquired their bibliographic references through the library’s resources or resorted to other venues. Citation analysis is being conducted via Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science database and through surveying faculty for feedback on how they located their sources. Statistical data gathered will be used to determine what resources the university is lacking, how those resources compare to literature research data in the STEM fields, and future necessities as the library assists in pursuing grants for further STEM education programs. These statistical graphs will provide collection management suggestions that will be helpful to other libraries in improving research assistance as STEM becomes a vital part of the Common Core in the public schools. The three sections will be tied together using botanical illustrations to emphasize the word play on the acronym.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Easy Readers: Caldecott eBooks on Reserve Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster presentation highlights a unique pilot program to test the usefulness of providing award-winning children’s literature in eBook format. A high demand for quality PreK-12 literature exists at many institutions offering teacher education programs. These heavily-used titles are often assigned as class readings and many are placed on reserve. The Access Services Librarian analyzed circulation statistics of Caldecott Medal and honor books, evaluated eBook vendors, and purchased eBook copies. EBook access helps satisfy on-campus patron demand while increasing resources for students enrolled in off-site courses. It further supports the preparation of future teachers who are called upon to teach with technology, including eBooks, in the 21st Century classroom.
The poster graphically represents the assessment of usage statistics for print copies of the Caldecott Medal and honor books as compared with those for the acquired eBook versions. Colorful marketing materials and book covers created by the Education Librarian demonstrate methods to advertise and promote use of the new eBook collection. Results of the survey conducted in children’s literature courses to determine patron reactions to children’s books, especially picture books, in eBook form. These findings describe the effectiveness, convenience, and practicality of accessing and reading juvenile books in this format and patron preferences for print versus electronic. The poster visually celebrates successful librarian collaboration in support of both better access and improved curriculum materials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Harnessing the Wisdom of the Patrons: Creating a Maryland based Historical/ Genealogical Lecture Series Program on a Zero Dollar Budget Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Cultural heritage institutions can utilize their patrons as lecturers and presenters. An organization’s patrons have a vast amount of knowledge obtained through using the repository’s collections, performing research for other parties, publishing historical works, and interacting with staff. Patrons are likely to volunteer their services provided that they given a clear idea as to what is expected of them should they wish to lecture, they are able to schedule themselves to present on a date that meets their needs, they believe in the repository as an asset, they can present on a topic that interests them, they appreciate the repository’s staff who have helped them in the past so they feel the need to give back something to the repository, they are able to advertise their research services during their lecture, and they are thanked for lecturing.

The poster will include the proposal document for the 2012/2013 lecture series held at the Maryland State Archives. Also images (print or digital) will be shown of the promotional flyers used to advertise the lecture series, the online promotion ads, photos of a lecture in progress, and the scheduling lists of the lectures held from September 2012 to May 2013.

The success of the lecture series will be measured by the attendance numbers (whether attendance went up or not with each new lecture) and by survey results (whether patrons express interest in presenting at future lectures or attending future lectures).

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Open Folklore: Improving Open Access Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Open Folklore, from the American Folklore Society and Indiana University Bloomington Libraries, is an Open Access scholarly resource. It brings together feeds of freely available online scholarly materials from collections as diverse as HathiTrust, institutional repositories, and online journals that focus specifically on materials relevant to the study of folklore. The next step for Open Folklore is to make the search and discovery of these materials as user-friendly as possible. Gathering the harvested collection feeds into Drupal, an open-source content management system, and creating Drupal-specific Biblio records allows Open Folklore to index and provide tailored access for the folklore researcher – creating faceted searching on indexes of date ranges, subjects, authors, sources, and collections specific to the field of folklore. Contextual help also provides educational information to folklore researchers on what types of sources are being used and how Open Access resources benefit folklorists and open the scholarship of folklore to new venues, audiences, and ideas.

This poster will showcase the plans and progress of Open Folklore’s new faceted searching interface and report feedback from the folklore community on ease of use and educational impact.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Bridging the Boundaries of Need and Access to Information Resources Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As the University of Arizona Libraries employ a 21st century user-centered approach to information resource management, we have adopted a Patron-Driven Acquisitions program. Fundamentally, the program is based on the model of users as the drivers of library acquisitions. By imbedding order records in the library catalog and by identifying user needs through interlibrary loan requests, the library is able to acquire targeted information resources that more efficiently meet the research needs of our users. This service significantly enhances the user experience and allows the UA Libraries to see greater use of our resources.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Print Book vs. DDA ebook Acquisition and Use at KSU Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In January 2012, Kent State University Libraries implemented a 6-month pilot project for a Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) ebook purchasing model that uses a combination of the acquisition services provided by our primary book jobber (YBP) and the access services provided by an Ebook distributer (eBrary). Using the book jobber mediated DDA model provided the library with selected discovery records that closely matched specifications of the library’s print approval plan. The initial record load for DDA eligible records consisted of about 22,000 ebook records. New discovery records were added to the catalog each week as new eBrary ebooks became available.

This presentation will report our assessment of this new acquisition model as compared to that of print books in terms of budget, costs, workflow, subjects, publishers, and publication dates. Because DDA empowers library users to choose which ebooks are actually purchased based on actual use, our assessment also compares ebook usage from a DDA discovery pool with print book circulation of an equivalent amount of latest acquisitions. The results of this study will help answer some of the key questions about this new acquisition model: (1) Does DDA align the library’s collection with current user requirements? (2) Does DDA lead to more active use of library book collection? (3) Is DDA cost-effective as an acquisition model? (4) What issues are associated with DDA and how may these issues be addressed?

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Visualizing Digital Collections: Creating User-Friendly Search and Browse Tools Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster will discuss the process of creating fun and informative data visualization tools for digital collections, drawing on the experiences of the Cold War International History Project (CWIHP) Digital Archive and survey data from CWIHP's users. (New beta website: http://cwihp-live.secondstory.net, permanent address: http://digitalarchive.org). One of the main goals of the re-designed CWIHP Digital Archive was to develop a user-friendly way of visualizing the project's complex set of historical documents. CWIHP's previous website made it very difficult for new researchers to orient themselves to the collections and get a good understanding of the site's content. CWIHP has a very complex collection of archival documents which have been translated from 25 different languages and drawn from over 100 different archives around the world. The website's new “browse” tool attempts to give users an easy and fun way to explore the documents. An interactive map allows users to zoom in on the specific region of the world or a country in which they are interested, while below a constantly-updated graph displays the number of documents available by year, as well as the most common subject headings for that location. Although CWIHP worked with a dedicated web design firm, other institutions could build similar interactive data visualizations using freely available tools such as elastic lists (http://moritz.stefaner.eu/projects/elastic-lists/) and Viewshare (http://viewshare.org). Such tools leverage the detailed metadata digital collections already contain, creating exciting new ways of visualizing and interacting with existing online collections.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
What is the Value of Course Reserves to our Stakeholders? Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The use of course reserves continues to grow year after year at the University of Toronto Scarborough Library. Similar to many other academic libraries, the circulation of course reserves is the one area of growth compared to the circulation of the general collection. In library literature to date, there has been limited research and study about the use and value of course reserve collections to library stakeholders.
For our study, we focused our assessment in terms of exploring the direct economic value course reserves give students and the possible indirect value gained by administrators and staff by providing this service (increased student satisfaction, student retention, etc). Specifically we use Return on Investment (ROI) as a metric to guide our investigation and conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis The purpose of our research is to investigate the direct and indirect value of course reserves to various stakeholders (university administrators, library management/staff and students). We will also report on the results of a student use survey of course reserves (n=1,337 or 10%).
Since virtually all academic libraries provide a course reserve service to students, the practical applications for this research are significant. As academic libraries are being increasingly called upon to demonstrate their value to their institutions, the conclusions of this research should help guides libraries on the future provision and marketing of the service to students and the reporting of the service’s impact to university administration.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 11:30am

11:30am - 12:00pm
Ignite Saturday Session: Teen PTSD and the Urban Library Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102d
Description :

Many of our kids live in urban war zones and deal with everyday stresses that rival the average soldier at war. This session will introduce strategies and ideas for the school librarian on how to address and combat the overwhelming stressors placed an adolescents in poor urban schools. Learn how to introduce meditation, build a quiet room, and more.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 12:30pm

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Anatomy of a Storytime Literacy Message: Research, Encouragement, and Ideas in 60 Seconds or Less Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In response to the release of Every Child Read to Read 2nd Edition and to feedback from its storytime providers, the Arapahoe Library District recently revised its five-year-old method for helping storytime providers deliver early literacy messages to parents and caregivers during storytimes. In the past, storytime providers were trained in the ECRR six early literacy skills and invited to create their own early literacy messages for each storytime. The new strategy responds to the storytime providers' stated need for more early literacy instruction and more support for providing messages. Key components of the new strategy include a four-part template for brief storytime literacy messages, a plan for connecting each literacy message with a storytime activity, and relevant early literacy research background information for the storytime provider. The poster session will highlight a visual breakdown of the four-part literacy message template and how the template synthesizes content from both ECRR 1st Edition and ECRR 2nd Edition. The board will also include photos of literacy activities in action during storytime as well as samples of the information sheets used to share the research-based content of the new strategy with the storytime providers. Response to the strategy has been positive, as seen in comments from parents and caregivers received through a survey assessing storytimes, as well as in feedback gathered from storytime providers during regular storytime training sessions.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Computer Science Citations: An Analysis of Doctoral Candidates’ Research Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Most academic libraries in North America have collections of dissertations and theses written by students seeking advanced degrees. Universities have taken three different approaches.
The first approach is for university libraries to digitize dissertations and theses and make them accessible online. The second, universities establish electronic dissertation/theses submission systems so students can submit their own electronic copies of dissertation/theses to the system. The third way involves the physical storage of dissertations and theses.
Dissertations are the most comprehensive description of the research projects conducted by Ph.D. candidates while pursuing their advanced degrees. However, an examination of Google Scholar search results indicates that the citation rate is generally low within five years after a dissertation is published. One likely reason is that accessing a full-text dissertation is not as easy and convenient as journal articles and books. It is also possible that before a dissertation is published, the same author may have published articles in journals or conference proceedings of the same project topic.
The aim of this study is to examine the citation rate of dissertations in the field of computer science and, explore the relationship between citation rate, quality of dissertations, quality of other articles published by the same authors before the dissertation’s publication, and quality of the article venue.
In this study, 503 dissertations and 671 related articles were collected and analyzed using Excel and SAS. Five main publishing venues including conference proceedings, journals, dissertations, books, and open access repositories were considered for citation and score calculation.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Fact or Facebook: Digital Media Literacy and Digital Natives Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The proposed poster will address one method for teaching critical and digital media literacies used at the University of Missouri. Critical and digital media literacies go beyond text-based sources and extend to all forms of media that this generation of incoming freshmen interacts with on a daily basis. Although these “digital natives” rely heavily on these digital media outlets to satisfy their information needs, most are alarmingly deficient in their evaluation of digital, video, and social network newsfeed sources. Using actual examples of information and misinformation discovery through YouTube and social networking sites like Facebook, this poster will explain how instructors at the University of Missouri are helping students evaluate fact from Facebook. This poster will also provide examples of students’ reception of these critical evaluation skills and their perception of these information sources after completing the lesson.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Flip This Class! Using a Flipped Classroom Approach to Teach Information Literacy Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

A flipped classroom turns the traditional teaching approach upside down. Instead of a lecture in class and hands-on work at home, instructors assign material to be reviewed ahead of time, allowing for problem-solving activities during class time. Librarians can use this same approach to more fully engage students in “one-shot” or embedded library instruction. Students view or listen to tutorials or podcasts on developing search terms and using limiters and subject headings in advance, for example, then come to class prepared to apply these concepts to their research topics. Rather than spend class time focusing on learning the skills and tools to use library resources, the session is spent addressing concepts and applying what was learned in the pre-class assignment. Allowing students to do hands-on work in class brings an active-learning element and opportunity for critical thinking that is often lacking in traditional library instruction, especially “one-shot” sessions. It also moves the control of instruction and content away from the librarian and allows for more student inquiry. And, it gives librarians a chance to work more closely with students while they are engaged in their research. The combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning opportunities can also better address different types of learners and can be easily adapted to varying skill levels and subjects. This poster session will address ways librarians can use the flipped classroom approach to teach information literacy in a learning-centered manner.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
iAdapt: The Evolving Instructional Librarian Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In September 2012, Salem State University instructional librarians launched the Mobile Information Literacy Initiative to bring information literacy to diverse populations spread out over several campuses. Armed with iPads, determined to adapt with the evolving mobile landscape, project participants worked with a wide range of end users: tech-savvy students seeking instruction in academic applications for mobile devices; students with limited knowledge of mobile technologies; and faculty eager to apply them in classrooms.
Participants researched and demonstrated database apps and discipline-specific apps to enhance student research and instruction. iPads were used in place of laptops to teach information literacy classes and to provide roving research assistance to students across campus. Librarians utilized productivity apps to enhance presentations and incorporated concept-mapping apps to teach information literacy skills. Through the initiative students and faculty were introduced to apps serving a wide range of liberal arts and professional disciplines. Apps were appropriate for audiences ranging from preschool to graduate students. Instructional librarians were able to expand their professional knowledge and skills as they experienced the benefits and limitations of integrating mobile technologies into instruction. The poster session will use text, data, and images to explain all facets of the Mobile Information Literacy Initiative. It will provide a preliminary assessment of the initiative based on participant surveys and statistics on the deployment of iPads and Apps in research consultations and instruction.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Instruction Boot Camp: Collaborating for Better Instruction Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Most academic librarians are required to do some instruction, usually the ubiquitous one-shot 50 to 90 minute session. Librarians often develop these courses in isolation creating learning outcomes and planning sessions alone but this does not need to be the case. Instruction boot camp is a three hour session where teams of librarians “make over” an instruction session (one-shot) or workshop. The goal is to help the librarian teaching the session develop or improve the session learning outcomes, share ideas for instructional and learning activities, map these to the ACRL information literacy outcomes, and develop appropriate assessment techniques. Team members share and feed of each others' ideas, exchange teaching experiences, and developed instructional and assessment strategies as a team. Everyone benefits and can take something away that can be included in his/her teaching. The inspiration for instruction boot camp is a combination of the work the presenter did at ACRL Immersion in 2011, the writing boot camp held every quarter for the librarians to concentrate on their writing, and lesson planning activities. This poster includes information on the planning process, the different support materials provided, and the reactions of the librarians. Assessment methods include a self-evaluation of the course and plans for improvement as well as feedback about the process itself.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Making Online Training as Effective as Face to Face Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In the Fall of 2010, the NJIT Librarians redesigned a part of their
Freshmen Information Literacy program from a 90 minute face to face
session into an online asynchronous module. This poster will present
the summative assessment conducted to improve the online module ensuring that is indeed an effective replacement for the face to face workshop. The
assessment included student participation and grade comparison to
previous semesters, observation, viewcount vs. submission comparison,
review by instruction librarians outside of the university, survey of students,
and instructor feedback. Results are used as a formative assessment
as well to make improvements to the course each semester.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Mapping History: Toward a Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy Program Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

History students are often introduced to primary and secondary source research through the Library and Special Collections. In an effort to create an intentional information literacy experience for these students, the History and Special Collections librarians at UNC Charlotte have collaborated on a research project that maps where and when library instruction meets History students. Research instruction sessions and one-on-one consultations are mapped to semester course offerings to identify in which classes faculty members connect students to the library for research assistance. Data from a university enrollment reporting system is used to identify redundancy in library instruction by mapping student enrollment in History courses to offered information literacy sessions. Research findings are shared with the History department in hopes of creating a dialog about how the Library and Special Collections can more strategically work with faculty to create a meaningful and consistent experience for History majors. The results of the project, including maps, graphs and feedback from the faculty, will be displayed.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Research for the 99% : Bringing Academic Research to Occupy Wall Street Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

How can citizens without access to specialized scholarly information confront misinformation and misrepresentation in their communities? How can libraries get involved more directly in the social movements of our time? In an eight-month pilot project, three librarians from three different institutions were brought together by Metropolitan New York Library Council to join forces in an outreach project offering research help to Occupy Wall Street. Using free online collaboration tools and social media to partner with members of the environmental subgroup of Occupy Wall Street, they overcame issues of distance, proprietary roadblocks (copyright), and trust/skepticism to discover the authentic information needs of activists and compile an annotated bibliography of scholarly research on the real-world impacts of climate change.

This project explores the idea of a “library without borders” and highlights issues of open access scholarship, open source communication, and the digital divide. This poster will provide a road map for outreach, using photographs of Occupy events, screenshots illustrating how these three librarians used Zotero and Google+ Hangouts for collaborative research, samples of the final research product, and evaluative feedback from members of Occupy Wall Street and the environmental activist communities on forums, blogs, and email responses. From brainstorming to final research product to evaluation, this poster will illustrate the research experience in a clear fashion that invites other librarians to replicate the process and reach out to groups in their own communities, bringing academic research beyond the library and into the street.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
The MAGIC of Web Tutorials: Developing Best Practices to (Re)Focus on Users Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Libraries of all shapes and sizes are moving instructional content online. But, what are the best practices in this area? What works, and what doesn’t? What can libraries and librarians do to make online information appealing, engaging, and useful enough that patrons take advantage of it?

The Oakland University Library considered these questions and undertook a project to (re)assess how to leverage the library’s social and technology resources to make online tutorials more focused on students’ and faculty’s needs. Through a multi-part assessment process, the eLearning and Instructional Technology Librarian reconsidered the web tutorials offerings through faculty and staff feedback, a literature review of best practices, and an analysis of other universities’ online tutorial offerings. From this information, the eLearning and Instructional Technology Librarian developed the MAGIC guidelines (Manageable, Accessible, Geared at users, Informative, Customizable) for restructuring online tutorials to put users at the center. Employing MAGIC meant integrating web tutorials at points-of-need, identifying and sharing essential information, and engaging students in the learning whenever possible. Library faculty evaluation at the beginning and end of this process support the effectiveness of MAGIC in improving online tutorials!

This poster will use before-and-after images of tutorials and the library’s tutorials page to illustrate MAGIC and the shift toward user-centered resources. Other visuals, including infographics of faculty feedback, will illustrate how the MAGIC framework helped one library advance its online learning options. Furthermore, attendees will be able to experience the library’s revamped tutorials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

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