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Format: 04/22/2018 - 11pm
Format: 04/22/2018 - 11pm
Time Title Type Location

Friday, June 28 - 3:00pm

3:00pm - 4:00pm
Emerging Leaders Poster Session and Reception Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
S405
Description :

The ALA 2013 class of Emerging Leaders will showcase their final projects at a poster session and reception at this poster session. It will be the culminating event for this class of Emerging Leaders. Since the ALA Midwinter Meeting the groups have been working virtually on projects related to ALA or a professional concern. These groups have been supported by ALA staff and member mentors from the profession. The poster session will allow each group to showcase its creative and innovative solutions for their projects. All are welcomed and encouraged to attend.

Interests :
Sponsors :
ALA
ALA Office for Human Resource Development & Recruitment (HRDR)

Saturday, June 29 - 10:30am

10:30am - 12:00pm
Academic Authorship and Personal Name Headings in Library of Congress Authorities : A case study at a small liberal arts college Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As a new participant in the NACO-MN Funnel Project, Carleton wants to implement the new practice for the academic community of our campus, besides serving larger cataloging communities. The Carleton College faculty is very active in research, creating and editing numerous books and book chapters annually. We are interested to learn whether our campus authors have appropriate name authority records in the Library of Congress Authorities and, if not, how many were completely lacking any personal name records. Changes resulting from the implementation of RDA have allowed for much richer personal name authorities providing the opportunity to include such information as the author's affiliation, field of activity, professional occupation, and many other attributes. Initially, we looked at the faculty that had published only during the 2011/12 academic year. We then will continue on, stepping backwards year by year, looking at our faculty authors and their personal name authorities. As we do so, we will involve the faculty members in the creation of their headings. This provides us an opportunity to learn about our faculty, and it will give the faculty new insight into the work of the library. In most cases, this may be the first time, a faculty member learns about his/her authority heading and its importance.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Access on a Budget: Striking a Healthly Balance Between Database Subscriptions and Interlibrary Loan Services Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

It was once stated that libraries could not afford to buy every book published. The same case can be made for online journals. Interlibrary Loan is not a replacement for journal subscriptions, but is it necessary to have subscriptions to every database when the use does not merit the cost? Libraries must come to the realization that they cannot subscribe to every full-text database and must make decisions on what should be included in the collection and what should be left to interlibrary loan to fulfill. The poster will highlight the value of interlibrary loan in relation to the rising cost of database subscriptions and the desire to provide rapid access to patrons. The poster will present statistics data taken from current database costs compared to operating costs of Interlibrary Loan department from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Archives 2.0: If You Like It Then You Should Put a Pin On It Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As part of an academic library, special collections departments serve several populations: undergraduates, graduate students, researchers, and public users. One of their main points of emphasis is to explore new ways to engage users and promote rare books and localized collections. In order to determine if using social media could increase the awareness and usage of special collections materials, the University of Tennessee recently uploaded content into two platforms: Pinterest and HistoryPin.
HistoryPin and Pinterest were chosen because they are established platforms that provide familiar user experiences in terms of searching, sharing, and interacting with content. They also allow libraries to expose materials and deliver services to users outside of library instruction and traditional outreach activities. In order to measure success, Google Analytics and built-in statistical tools from Pinterest and HistoryPin were used to generate data on usage and collection access.
This poster will provide data that demonstrates the value of using social media applications to promote and increase the usage of digital special collections material. Its findings are important because there is limited research on whether – and how – social platforms affect access to and discovery of digital collections. The presenters will also have tablets on hand for a real-time demonstration of the technical tools used in the study.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Blossoming the STEM: Libraries working as STEM education partners Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Library faculty at the University of Memphis have recently become very involved in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. To acquaint ALA attendees of ways the library can partner in this field, the poster will first define STEM and list its areas of academic study, federal agencies, and corporate supporters. A second column will list ways that public, school, and academic libraries have successively collaborated throughout the country based on library literature.
Finally, graphs and statistics will make up the final third related to an ongoing project that is investigating the publications by STEM faculty at this institution over the last 5 years to determine if the authors acquired their bibliographic references through the library’s resources or resorted to other venues. Citation analysis is being conducted via Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science database and through surveying faculty for feedback on how they located their sources. Statistical data gathered will be used to determine what resources the university is lacking, how those resources compare to literature research data in the STEM fields, and future necessities as the library assists in pursuing grants for further STEM education programs. These statistical graphs will provide collection management suggestions that will be helpful to other libraries in improving research assistance as STEM becomes a vital part of the Common Core in the public schools. The three sections will be tied together using botanical illustrations to emphasize the word play on the acronym.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
CANCELLED: Kiss My Assessment: Summoning Better Results after the Implementation of a Discovery Tool Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Library instruction is a crucial part of the mission of the University of Missouri St. Louis (UMSL) Libraries. Instruction is offered in many ways including reference desk interactions, individual research consultations, and library instruction sessions. To assess instruction efforts, the UMSL Libraries created an assessment instrument based on the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Information Literacy Standards. This assessment is administered to students before and after library instruction sessions to determine their information literacy levels and the effectiveness of the sessions. A satisfaction survey is also distributed to students who participate in research consultations and instruction sessions. In 2012, the UMSL Libraries implemented Summon, a single search discovery tool that allows users to search across the library catalog, online journal, magazine, and newspaper sources, and institutional repositories. Summon has significantly changed the Libraries’ instruction and assessment practices. A single search tool reduces the need to teach patrons to access several different databases, catalogs, and collections to find information. However, patrons must be able to understand the relevancy of and the difference between results displayed in Summon (i.e. scholarly books and journals as well as magazines and newspapers). This poster session will use a display board to provide visual examples of how instruction practices and assessments changed after the implementation of Summon. Charts and graphs will be used to compare research consultation satisfaction survey results before and after Summon. Handouts will also be also provided that summarize this information.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Censorship: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Parents, school administrators and library directors want what they feel to be inappropriate books removed from our libraries. Librarians sometimes self-censor because they fear that the books they select will be challenge and they might lose their jobs and be seen as not caring for the children they serve. Censorship is all around us and yet it is something that librarians almost never discuss outside of Banned Book Book Week. However, librarians have historically been advocates for the Freedom to Read. When we embrace that heritage we can honestly assess our fears and concerns about censorship and also lead other in addressing their questions and concerns as well. My poster will show the many concerns that parents, teachers and community members have regarding censorship as well as the main reasons that these various groups challenge books. Personal stories and court cases will also be explored in detail. Solutions will be offered as to how these issues can be resolved and prevented. Finally the heroics efforts of librarians in the past and the present who have stood up in the face of censorship at the cost of their economic, social and even personal security will be highlighted. The impact will be to hopefully start a open and honest conversation that will bring this difficult issue to light.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Easy Readers: Caldecott eBooks on Reserve Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster presentation highlights a unique pilot program to test the usefulness of providing award-winning children’s literature in eBook format. A high demand for quality PreK-12 literature exists at many institutions offering teacher education programs. These heavily-used titles are often assigned as class readings and many are placed on reserve. The Access Services Librarian analyzed circulation statistics of Caldecott Medal and honor books, evaluated eBook vendors, and purchased eBook copies. EBook access helps satisfy on-campus patron demand while increasing resources for students enrolled in off-site courses. It further supports the preparation of future teachers who are called upon to teach with technology, including eBooks, in the 21st Century classroom.
The poster graphically represents the assessment of usage statistics for print copies of the Caldecott Medal and honor books as compared with those for the acquired eBook versions. Colorful marketing materials and book covers created by the Education Librarian demonstrate methods to advertise and promote use of the new eBook collection. Results of the survey conducted in children’s literature courses to determine patron reactions to children’s books, especially picture books, in eBook form. These findings describe the effectiveness, convenience, and practicality of accessing and reading juvenile books in this format and patron preferences for print versus electronic. The poster visually celebrates successful librarian collaboration in support of both better access and improved curriculum materials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Electronic Journals: Correlating User-Defined Value Metrics for Informed Collection Management Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

For years, libraries have searched for the perfect usage metrics to help make tough journal retention decisions. Available usage metrics have unique limitations. Download statistics from link resolvers and vendors do not tell the whole story, as a downloaded article does not mean it is later read or cited. Value metrics such as Impact Factors are based on short time intervals not reflecting citation patterns of all disciplines, and can be manipulated. For this study, user value was assessed in three categories: utility / reading value, quality / citing value, and cost effectiveness. Anonymous data from U-MNs central authentication system captured users’ department, degree program, and position. The project combines and compares these metrics. It determines the value academic users assign to electronic journal collections via journal article download and citation activity. As this project’s questions are framed around comparing variables and their relationships, correlation analysis was the chosen methodology. What emerges is a granular picture of journal usage trends at the disciplinary level, creating a customized and powerful approach to collection management.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Floating Collection in a Large Academic Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

“If our libraries’ collection is ‘one collection, geographically dispersed,’ why do we have to ship books back to the library of origin after they are returned by a patron?” In response to this question, Penn State University Libraries charged a task force with examining the feasibility of a “floating collection” – a group of items that are not housed permanently at a specific library, but instead are shelved at the library that most recently discharged them. Floating collections have been successful in public libraries, but no evidence was found by the task force that the concept had been implemented in a large academic library system. This poster session will discuss the investigation into the feasibility of a floating collection in a large academic library, the pilot, and the successful implementation of a floating collection at Penn State. The floating collection, limited to circulating monographs in the general stacks of campus libraries, proved to be much easier to implement than the task force imagined it would be. Several potential “show-stoppers” were encountered during the pilot, but each was resolved successfully. In addition to reducing shipping costs and lessening staff workload, there were also some unintended benefits: collections were weeded, inactive reserves were discovered and removed, and searching in the catalog was improved. In these times of budget cuts and decreased staffing, floating collections just make sense. This poster proposal has also been submitted for consideration for the 2013 ACRL conference.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Harnessing the Wisdom of the Patrons: Creating a Maryland based Historical/ Genealogical Lecture Series Program on a Zero Dollar Budget Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Cultural heritage institutions can utilize their patrons as lecturers and presenters. An organization’s patrons have a vast amount of knowledge obtained through using the repository’s collections, performing research for other parties, publishing historical works, and interacting with staff. Patrons are likely to volunteer their services provided that they given a clear idea as to what is expected of them should they wish to lecture, they are able to schedule themselves to present on a date that meets their needs, they believe in the repository as an asset, they can present on a topic that interests them, they appreciate the repository’s staff who have helped them in the past so they feel the need to give back something to the repository, they are able to advertise their research services during their lecture, and they are thanked for lecturing.

The poster will include the proposal document for the 2012/2013 lecture series held at the Maryland State Archives. Also images (print or digital) will be shown of the promotional flyers used to advertise the lecture series, the online promotion ads, photos of a lecture in progress, and the scheduling lists of the lectures held from September 2012 to May 2013.

The success of the lecture series will be measured by the attendance numbers (whether attendance went up or not with each new lecture) and by survey results (whether patrons express interest in presenting at future lectures or attending future lectures).

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Open Folklore: Improving Open Access Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Open Folklore, from the American Folklore Society and Indiana University Bloomington Libraries, is an Open Access scholarly resource. It brings together feeds of freely available online scholarly materials from collections as diverse as HathiTrust, institutional repositories, and online journals that focus specifically on materials relevant to the study of folklore. The next step for Open Folklore is to make the search and discovery of these materials as user-friendly as possible. Gathering the harvested collection feeds into Drupal, an open-source content management system, and creating Drupal-specific Biblio records allows Open Folklore to index and provide tailored access for the folklore researcher – creating faceted searching on indexes of date ranges, subjects, authors, sources, and collections specific to the field of folklore. Contextual help also provides educational information to folklore researchers on what types of sources are being used and how Open Access resources benefit folklorists and open the scholarship of folklore to new venues, audiences, and ideas.

This poster will showcase the plans and progress of Open Folklore’s new faceted searching interface and report feedback from the folklore community on ease of use and educational impact.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Patron Driven Acquisitions: Determining the Metrics to Measure a Program’s Performance Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In July, 2011 the University of Arizona Libraries dramatically changed how it managed its monographic selection for both print and electronic books. Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) was introduced as the primary tool for the collection development of monographic holdings. This change in policy was a direct result of maintaining a commitment to meeting the research needs of our customers while facing an economic/budget crisis that resulted in the loss of roughly one-third of the full-time librarians.
PDA programs are based on vendor managed inventory or jointly managed inventory programs and are common in the private sector, but adapting this concept to collection development is relatively new to the library world. With that in mind, the library formed the On-Demand Information Delivery (ODID) Metrics team in January, 2012 to establish a set of metrics to evaluate the PDA program. The poster will examine the results of the team’s findings and provide extensive analysis of the purchases by Library of Congress (LC) classification, publishers, format type, and other metrics. The poster’s charts and graphs will illustrate study results, lessons learned, and provide an overview the changes to the collection created by the shift to PDA.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Bridging the Boundaries of Need and Access to Information Resources Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As the University of Arizona Libraries employ a 21st century user-centered approach to information resource management, we have adopted a Patron-Driven Acquisitions program. Fundamentally, the program is based on the model of users as the drivers of library acquisitions. By imbedding order records in the library catalog and by identifying user needs through interlibrary loan requests, the library is able to acquire targeted information resources that more efficiently meet the research needs of our users. This service significantly enhances the user experience and allows the UA Libraries to see greater use of our resources.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Print Book vs. DDA ebook Acquisition and Use at KSU Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In January 2012, Kent State University Libraries implemented a 6-month pilot project for a Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) ebook purchasing model that uses a combination of the acquisition services provided by our primary book jobber (YBP) and the access services provided by an Ebook distributer (eBrary). Using the book jobber mediated DDA model provided the library with selected discovery records that closely matched specifications of the library’s print approval plan. The initial record load for DDA eligible records consisted of about 22,000 ebook records. New discovery records were added to the catalog each week as new eBrary ebooks became available.

This presentation will report our assessment of this new acquisition model as compared to that of print books in terms of budget, costs, workflow, subjects, publishers, and publication dates. Because DDA empowers library users to choose which ebooks are actually purchased based on actual use, our assessment also compares ebook usage from a DDA discovery pool with print book circulation of an equivalent amount of latest acquisitions. The results of this study will help answer some of the key questions about this new acquisition model: (1) Does DDA align the library’s collection with current user requirements? (2) Does DDA lead to more active use of library book collection? (3) Is DDA cost-effective as an acquisition model? (4) What issues are associated with DDA and how may these issues be addressed?

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Smithsonian Public Tagging Initiatve Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As part of a graduate student course practicum, I coordinated the Public Tagging Initiative at the Smithsonian Archives of American Gardens. The AAG is part of the Smithsonian's larger Collections Search Center that participates in the public tagging initiative. Throughout my time as coordinator during American Archives Month, I promoted our social tagging and kept track of public tags accumulated during that month. We were able to not only receive an unprecedented number of tags, the archives was also able to identify previously unknown items in the collection thanks to this initiative.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Survival of the Fittest: The Evolving Nature of Metadata Creation for Digital Collections Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

There is a common misconception that metadata creation for digital collections is performed in a single step by subject experts. Once the metadata record is created it is believed that the record remains mostly unchanged. Practical experience demonstrates that designing and implementing digital collections is a learning process. While ideally the collection designer should have a good understanding of the content of a collection before starting the digitization process, practice has shown that most commonly a deep knowledge about the collection is acquired as the digitization project develops. Given the diversity of the material in digital collections, it is difficult yet necessary to take on the role of expert. Basically, a common approach is to learn by doing. While conforming to metadata standards such as Dublin Core, metadata element sets evolve in a way to capture the peculiarities of unique materials, the needs of users or technological trends (such as linked data). The learning process in each individual digital collection might have some implications for previously developed digital collections as well for designing future collections. Other factors such as improvement of cross-collection searches or the need for compliance to various consortia standards might also influence decisions to revise legacy collections. This poster exemplifies the evolving nature of metadata through a pictorial timeline that expands over a decade, identifying the development of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries digital collections, the context of their development, and the various factors that emerged later on that have influenced revisions of metadata decisions.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Up, Up, and Away with RDA! Integrating the New Rules Effectively into a Copy Cataloging Workflow Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The University of Illinois at Chicago Library (UIC) will be adopting the Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloging rules into their technical services workflows beginning Spring 2013. Adherence to the new standards will be a key factor for enhancing access to library materials, as well as for outreach to those non-library web communities who seek to organize their information for purposes of sharing their data for the greater good. In preparation for this, the Technical Services unit has been preparing for the formal workflow changes through an analysis of compounding factors, identifying necessary changes to the current workflow process, and creating and implementing training for affected faculty and staff.

In order to prepare staff for a smooth transition, the following factors and their influence were considered: local, national, and international impact of migration; the scope of changes needed to be made to bibliographic records; staffing resources; levels of staff training; potential conflicts with automated and outsourced workflows; ILS considerations; the roles of external cataloging agencies such as LC and OCLC; and the acceptance and concrete support of the local library administration.

This poster presentation will outline the outcomes of this analysis and implementation, including early statistical measurements of workflow outputs. Emphasis will be on detailing the training strategy and the proposed training model used to facilitate adoption, as well as flowcharts of policy decisions and anticipated workflow procedures. Handouts including training techniques and cataloging documentation samples will be available.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Visualizing Digital Collections: Creating User-Friendly Search and Browse Tools Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster will discuss the process of creating fun and informative data visualization tools for digital collections, drawing on the experiences of the Cold War International History Project (CWIHP) Digital Archive and survey data from CWIHP's users. (New beta website: http://cwihp-live.secondstory.net, permanent address: http://digitalarchive.org). One of the main goals of the re-designed CWIHP Digital Archive was to develop a user-friendly way of visualizing the project's complex set of historical documents. CWIHP's previous website made it very difficult for new researchers to orient themselves to the collections and get a good understanding of the site's content. CWIHP has a very complex collection of archival documents which have been translated from 25 different languages and drawn from over 100 different archives around the world. The website's new “browse” tool attempts to give users an easy and fun way to explore the documents. An interactive map allows users to zoom in on the specific region of the world or a country in which they are interested, while below a constantly-updated graph displays the number of documents available by year, as well as the most common subject headings for that location. Although CWIHP worked with a dedicated web design firm, other institutions could build similar interactive data visualizations using freely available tools such as elastic lists (http://moritz.stefaner.eu/projects/elastic-lists/) and Viewshare (http://viewshare.org). Such tools leverage the detailed metadata digital collections already contain, creating exciting new ways of visualizing and interacting with existing online collections.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
What is the Value of Course Reserves to our Stakeholders? Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The use of course reserves continues to grow year after year at the University of Toronto Scarborough Library. Similar to many other academic libraries, the circulation of course reserves is the one area of growth compared to the circulation of the general collection. In library literature to date, there has been limited research and study about the use and value of course reserve collections to library stakeholders.
For our study, we focused our assessment in terms of exploring the direct economic value course reserves give students and the possible indirect value gained by administrators and staff by providing this service (increased student satisfaction, student retention, etc). Specifically we use Return on Investment (ROI) as a metric to guide our investigation and conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis The purpose of our research is to investigate the direct and indirect value of course reserves to various stakeholders (university administrators, library management/staff and students). We will also report on the results of a student use survey of course reserves (n=1,337 or 10%).
Since virtually all academic libraries provide a course reserve service to students, the practical applications for this research are significant. As academic libraries are being increasingly called upon to demonstrate their value to their institutions, the conclusions of this research should help guides libraries on the future provision and marketing of the service to students and the reporting of the service’s impact to university administration.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

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