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Format: 04/22/2018 - 11pm
Format: 04/22/2018 - 11pm
Time Title Type Location

Friday, June 28 - 8:30am

8:30am - 11:30am
Technical Services Directors of Large Research Libraries Interest Group Discussion/Interest group Sheraton Chicago
Sheraton Ballroom 1 & 2
Description :

Meeting of Big Heads

Friday, June 28 - 3:00pm

3:00pm - 4:00pm
RUSA 101: Network, Get Oriented, Get Involved Orientation Session, Program Hyatt Regency McCormick Place
Jackson Park 10ABC
Description :

If you’re new to RUSA or are a longtime member looking for opportunities to connect with members and ways to get involved, make sure to put RUSA 101 on your calendar! Spend an hour with us on Friday from 3-4p.m. before heading off to the opening of the exhibit floor.

Saturday, June 29 - 8:30am

8:30am - 10:00am
Making a Mentorship Match: What Works, What Doesn't, and What Can ALA Offer? Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S103d
Description :

Members of an Emerging-Leaders project group, working with the Office of Diversity, examine mentorship programs across ALA and lead a discussion on best practices. Join in to hear about what mentorship offerings are available across ALA, discuss how to find the best fit for a mentor or mentee, and share what works and what doesn't when it comes to starting a mentoring relationship.

Sponsors :
Spectrum Scholars Program
ALA-DIVERSITY

Saturday, June 29 - 10:30am

10:30am - 12:00pm
What's Beyond the Music Library? - Music Representation in Non-Music Databases Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This research project was completed to assist students in the music field locate interdisciplinary articles outside of the common music databases and article indexes. The search results of three non-music/humanities databases (PsycINFO, Social Sciences Full Text and America: History & Life) were analyzed in order to determine the coverage of music materials. In this study, only recent, relevant articles were counted in the search results. Book reviews and articles published earlier than 2007 were not included. This study includes data and graphs that illustrate recent trends in music research within these non-music databases as well as popular topics covered in the articles (Music & Emotion, Music & Culture, Music & Race). This study aims to provide a guideline for those music researchers who are unfamiliar with non-music databases and in turn provide a road map for promoting interdisciplinary music research.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 11:30am

11:30am - 12:00pm
Ignite Saturday Session: Mismanaging Future Managers: Are Library Schools Failing to Adequately Prepare Administrators? Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102d
Description :

Over 1,000 academic, public, school and special librarians responded to a survey about the management education they received during their MLS programs. The aim of the survey was to determine their perceptions of the management curriculum offered in library schools. The survey results reveal a fascinating disconnect between the education librarians wanted while they were students and the education they wish they had received now that they are practitioners. Come to this Ignite Session to learn what librarians think about their management education and how it may need to change in the future.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 12:30pm

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Computer Science Citations: An Analysis of Doctoral Candidates’ Research Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Most academic libraries in North America have collections of dissertations and theses written by students seeking advanced degrees. Universities have taken three different approaches.
The first approach is for university libraries to digitize dissertations and theses and make them accessible online. The second, universities establish electronic dissertation/theses submission systems so students can submit their own electronic copies of dissertation/theses to the system. The third way involves the physical storage of dissertations and theses.
Dissertations are the most comprehensive description of the research projects conducted by Ph.D. candidates while pursuing their advanced degrees. However, an examination of Google Scholar search results indicates that the citation rate is generally low within five years after a dissertation is published. One likely reason is that accessing a full-text dissertation is not as easy and convenient as journal articles and books. It is also possible that before a dissertation is published, the same author may have published articles in journals or conference proceedings of the same project topic.
The aim of this study is to examine the citation rate of dissertations in the field of computer science and, explore the relationship between citation rate, quality of dissertations, quality of other articles published by the same authors before the dissertation’s publication, and quality of the article venue.
In this study, 503 dissertations and 671 related articles were collected and analyzed using Excel and SAS. Five main publishing venues including conference proceedings, journals, dissertations, books, and open access repositories were considered for citation and score calculation.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Learning from the Library: The Library as Leader in First-Year Experience Instructor Training Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Information literacy skills are at the heart of many first year seminar courses, yet the library often plays a limited role in course instruction and an even more limited role in course development. Capitalizing on the library’s unique central and interdisciplinary role on campus, Towson University’s Albert S. Cook Library developed and successfully implemented the university’s primary Seminar Instructor Training Series in order to play a more integral role in the first year seminar.

Like many first year seminars, Towson University’s seminar is crucial to the new student’s transition to the expectations of college level research and writing. In the course, students develop a foundation in information literacy and critical thinking skills through a topic-based curriculum. While seminar faculty are knowledgeable on their course topics, many often lack experience in teaching information literacy skills and structuring their research assignments appropriately for a foundational course. The training series lets librarians teach faculty how to integrate these important skills throughout their entire course rather than merely through a class library visit.
Surveys were given to attendees at the end of programs and a survey was sent to all seminar faculty (regardless of attendance) at the end of this academic year (2011-2012). The surveys give both qualitative and quantitative evidence on the success of the program and specifically the library's contribution. The evidence also shows that the library's information literacy and research assignment development has improved courses and student outcomes.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Personalized Library Instruction for 500 of Your Favorite Students: Utilizing Technology in Large Lecture Halls Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In the spring semester of 2013, the University of Arizona Libraries partnered with the Eller College of Management to provide instruction to all first-semester Eller students. An online toolkit of library resources was created in Blackboard. The first day of the semester, two groups of 250 students each assembled into a lecture hall and were provided with an overview of the Eller first-year experience, which included a 50-minute library instruction session. The challenge was how to provide an environment in which the students could have hands-on instruction while receiving personalized assistance and also to ensure that the students retained the concepts learned. The librarians utilized online quizzes to guide the in-class instruction and then required a four-part post-class tutorial, using interactive guide-on-the-side technology to strengthen retention and follow-up quizzes to test retention. First the librarians presented the tool and concept, then used an online quiz to guide the group through the process of searching, working with limiters, and creating reports. Next the students individually answered a series of randomized questions that required them to retrieve information utilizing those same tools and concepts. This poster’s charts, screen shots, and photos will examine the process, the technology utilized, and results from the quizzes and website analytics.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
The MAGIC of Web Tutorials: Developing Best Practices to (Re)Focus on Users Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Libraries of all shapes and sizes are moving instructional content online. But, what are the best practices in this area? What works, and what doesn’t? What can libraries and librarians do to make online information appealing, engaging, and useful enough that patrons take advantage of it?

The Oakland University Library considered these questions and undertook a project to (re)assess how to leverage the library’s social and technology resources to make online tutorials more focused on students’ and faculty’s needs. Through a multi-part assessment process, the eLearning and Instructional Technology Librarian reconsidered the web tutorials offerings through faculty and staff feedback, a literature review of best practices, and an analysis of other universities’ online tutorial offerings. From this information, the eLearning and Instructional Technology Librarian developed the MAGIC guidelines (Manageable, Accessible, Geared at users, Informative, Customizable) for restructuring online tutorials to put users at the center. Employing MAGIC meant integrating web tutorials at points-of-need, identifying and sharing essential information, and engaging students in the learning whenever possible. Library faculty evaluation at the beginning and end of this process support the effectiveness of MAGIC in improving online tutorials!

This poster will use before-and-after images of tutorials and the library’s tutorials page to illustrate MAGIC and the shift toward user-centered resources. Other visuals, including infographics of faculty feedback, will illustrate how the MAGIC framework helped one library advance its online learning options. Furthermore, attendees will be able to experience the library’s revamped tutorials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 1:00pm

1:00pm - 2:30pm
19th Annual Reference Research Forum Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S404bc
Description :

The Reference Research Forum continues to be one of the most popular and valuable programs during the ALA Annual Conference, where attendees can learn about notable projects conducted in the broad area of reference services such as user behavior, electronic services, reference effectiveness and assessment, and organizational structure and personnel. This year’s topics are: Research Guides Usability Study, Two Birds, One Stone: Using a Mixed Methods Approach to Measure Service Process and Identify Usability Pain Points in Virtual Reference, and Query Clarification in Chat Reference: A Visual Transcript Analysis.

1:00pm - 2:30pm
Author Adam Schrager reveals how the 20th century's greatest crime was solved Exhibitor session Hyatt Regency McCormick Place
Jackson Park 10A
Description :

Emmy-winning journalist and author Adam Schrager digs into the life of Arthur Koehler in "The Sixteenth Rail: The Evidence, the Scientist, and the Lindbergh Kidnapping." Before there was CSI and NCIS, there was a mild-mannered forensic scientist whose diligence would help solve the 20th century's greatest crime. Arthur Koehler was called the "Sherlock Holmes of his era" for his work tracing the ladder used to kidnap Charles Lindbergh's son to Bruno Hauptmann's attic and garage. A gripping tale of science and true crime. Adam Schrager is a producer and reporter with Wisconsin Public Television in Madison. In his career, Schrager has won numerous journalism accolades, including more than twenty Emmy awards.

Sponsors :
UNO
Unofficial Event
1:00pm - 2:30pm
Scholarly Communications Interest Group Discussion/Interest group McCormick Place Convention Center
N128
Description :

ORCID: Facilitating Interoperability for Research Universities

Rebecca Bryant
Director of Community, ORCID

ORCID is an international, interdisciplinary, not-for-profit, community-driven organization that provides an open registry of persistent unique identifiers for researchers and scholars. ORCID also automates linkages to research works by embedding identifiers in research workflows. In this presentation, we will discuss the opportunities and benefits of university integration with ORCID, share current integration user cases at universities and funding agencies, and provide information about how institutions can become ORCID members.

The Library Publishing Coalition Project: Building Capacity for an Emerging Area of Library Service Provision

Charles Watkinson
Executive Group, Library Publishing Coalition
Director, Purdue University Press
Head of Scholarly Publishing Services, Purdue Libraries

The Library Publishing Coalition Project is a two year program that began in January 2013 to build a collaborative framework to support the development of library publishing services in academic libraries. In 2012 a project sponsored by IMLS, "Library Publishing Services: Strategies for Success," reported that 55% of academic libraries of all sizes were either developing or implementing library services (including 79% of ARL libraries). It identified major needs for the development of best practices, collaboration to create community-based resources, and formalization of skills and training. The LPC project represents the response of a group of over fifty North American libraries to these recommendations. Programs currently under development include the publication of a directory of library publishing programs, the first of its kind; the organization of an annual meeting, to be first held in 2014; the creation of an online repository for sharing useful publishing tools, workflows, and documents; and the deployment of a targeted research agenda. This presentation will give an overview of library publishing activities as currently understood, describe how the LPC project fits into this landscape, and provide an update on progress so far. Plenty of time will be left for feedback and discussion.

The presentations will be followed by a brief business meeting.

Saturday, June 29 - 1:30pm

1:30pm - 2:15pm
Conversation Starters: Idaho Maker Spaces - Engaging Teens with STEM Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102d
Description :

Thought about starting a Maker Space in your library? Idaho has joined the Maker Movement by launching Maker Spaces in five public libraries across the state.

The State Library has implemented a pilot project that includes training on tools and technology, leveraging partnerships, involving community, and evaluating outcomes.

The results include formal and stealth programming which incorporate engineering, robotics, and other STEM topics to draw teens into these innovative spaces!

Come hear what Idaho is doing, what we are learning, and what's next.

There will be time for discussion, questions, and sharing.

The pilot project is initially focusing on engaging teens through Maker Spaces, but our goal is that these spaces will be available to the entire community.

The libraries in the pilot project represent diverse geographic regions as well as rural and urban communities.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 2:30pm

2:30pm - 4:00pm
Consumer Basics, Plain & Simple: Helping ALL Your Patrons Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Does nearly everyone in the community come to your library for advice and assistance? Do you help people who have a variety of backgrounds, cultures, literacy levels, and learning styles? And what about those folks who are juggling too many tasks in too little time? We all can benefit from concise and practical consumer tips. Come learn about a unique and innovative collaboration between the Federal Trade Commission and the non-profit Center for Applied Linguistics to train agency staff on how to write and design for people with challenges reading English, for whatever reasons. With this training, the FTC created unique consumer materials written in a direct, easy-to-use style that presents information in a manageable way. The resources cover just the basics on some key topics: the bottom line on what they need to know and do. Included are a website, one-page tip sheets, videos, and audio read-alongs to support readers’ understanding. The agency reached out to legal services organizations, ESL teachers, librarians, and nonprofits nationwide to identity what topics would be most helpful: credit, debt, identity theft, scams, budgeting, opening a bank account, shopping for prepaid cards, and managing money. The presenter will demonstrate the site, share copies of the materials, and explain the strategies used to create them.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
Many Books, Many Communities: How Choose to Read Ohio Encourages Ohioans to “Read Together, Read Ohio, Read for Life” Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

A statewide reading initiative for all ages, Choose to Read Ohio (CTRO) encourages libraries, schools, families, and others to build a community of readers and an appreciation of Ohio authors and literature. Every two years, with the input of dozens of librarians and educators, CTRO selects and promotes a booklist of 15-20 exemplary titles by authors native to or resident of Ohio. A companion reader’s toolkit is created for each book. Toolkits include discussion questions, extension projects (developed in light of academic content standards and 21st Century Skills), and activities suitable for library programming, classroom adoption, or family or book group use. The poster session features sample toolkits (available for attendees to take), CTRO author READ posters and other marketing items, and photos and evaluation information from creative CTRO projects produced by public, school, and academic libraries. CTRO was established with an eye toward One Book, One Community and other large-scale reading programs, but rather than featuring a single title, CTRO was developed to be highly adaptable, to provide a selection of books and resources for any group from a small book club to a school district or city, and to communicate the breadth of Ohio literature. CTRO is a project of the State Library of Ohio, Ohioana Library Association, Ohio Center for the Book, and other partners. It may be a model for local, regional, or state campaigns in support of collaboration, exploration, and the joy of reading and sharing books.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
2:30pm - 4:00pm
The Power of Crowdsourcing: A Use Case from the Biodiversity Heritage Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

How can a library with limited staff efficiently improve the discoverability and interoperability of digital assets? Answer: Crowdsource metadata enhancement! The Biodiversity Heritage Library, an open access digital library consortium, utilizes Flickr to provide access to over 60,000 images extracted from its digital collections. While bibliographic metadata is associated with these images at the time of upload to Flickr, identification of the species illustrated within each image is absent. Without these identifications, users are unable to efficiently search within image collections. Crowdsourcing offers a promising solution.

BHL staff have hosted two Flickr Tagging Parties at the Smithsonian. With guidance from BHL staff, nearly 40 Smithsonian staff added species name tags to 448 images in the BHL Flickr, resulting in a 53% increase in the number of monthly images typically tagged and a 97% increase in monthly images shared with external databases. This success has prompted BHL staff to develop formal instructional material and organize public crowdsourcing events. Not only does the tagging of images provide discoverability in BHL Flickr, but the images that are tagged are also automatically added to the Encyclopedia of Life, providing a “two birds, one stone” scenario.

Through the use of workflow diagrams, “before and after” examples, and graphs demonstrating project successes, this poster will outline the strategies employed to direct crowdsourced metadata enhancement activities. The principles guiding BHL crowdsourcing activities can be adopted by any library seeking creative ways to improve the relevance of their resources in an increasingly digital world.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 4:30pm

4:30pm - 6:30pm
ALSC 101 Orientation Session, Social event McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Meeting Room A
Description :

If you're new to ALSC or if this is your first Annual Conference as a children's librarian, then this program is for you! We'll provide you with information about the perks of ALSC membership, tips on how to get involved, and tricks of the trade for navigating Annual Conference. We'll also be raffling off some great ALSC prizes!

Saturday, June 29 - 5:00pm

5:00pm - 8:00pm
Atlas Systems Users Group Exhibitor session Marriott Magnificent Mile
Addison Room
Description :

A forum where users communicate experiences, ideas and technical expertise related to the use of Atlas Systems products including Ares reserves automation software and Aeon Special Collections management software.

Sponsors :
UNO
Unofficial Event

Sunday, June 30 - 8:00am

8:00am - 10:00am
Literary Tastes: Celebrating the Best Reading of the Year Author Event McCormick Place Convention Center
S103bc
Description :

Listen to some of the year’s best authors discuss their works and the craft of writing while enjoying the company of other book lovers. All Annual Conference registrants are invited to participate in this conference program.

**This program was selected as a Library Journal "top pick" for Annual Conference!**

This year's presenting authors:
==Peter Heller, author of 2013 RUSA Notable Book “The Dog Stars” (Knopf).
==Jonathan Tropper, author of 2013 RUSA Notable Book “One Last Thing Before I Go” (Dutton)
==Matti Friedman, author of “The Aleppo Codex: A True Story of Obsession, Faith, and the Pursuit of an Ancient Bible” (Algonquin), winner of the 2013 Sophie Brody Medal for achievement in Jewish literature
==Lyndsay Faye, author of “The Gods of Gotham” (Putnam), the top pick for The Reading List’s Mystery category in 2013

Authors will sign books following the presentation, which begins at 8:00am on Sunday, June 30.

Read more about these authors at the RUSA blog: http://rusa.ala.org/blog/2013/05/21/news-2013-annual-conference-literary...

You can bookend your day with fantastic authors by attending the Literary Tastes event in the morning, then celebrating the winners of the 2013 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction at our announcement event and reception on Sunday evening, co-sponsored by RUSA and Booklist. Get event details: http://ala13.ala.org/ticketed-events#RUSA-Booklist

Sunday, June 30 - 9:00am

9:15am - 10:00am
Conversation Starters: Achievement unlocked: Motivating and assessing user learning with digital badges Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102d
Description :

Libraries have increasingly begun to explore incorporating game design elements, such as digital badges, in their services to engage their user populations. Video games use digital badges to benchmark a player’s achievement as they progress throughout a game. Digital badges used in a real life setting can do this as well, as a way to assess a user’s progression as they develop a skill set. Digital badges are a wonderful way to highlight achievements, skill development, and learning in an online environments. Some libraries have begun to implement badge systems in various ways to assess and keep track of their users’ achievements.

Annie Pho, Young Lee, and Nicole Pagowsky will facilitate this conversation starter by discussing how libraries are using digital badges, current projects, and how attendees can implement badge systems in their own institutions. Panelists and attendees are encouraged to participate in a moderated discussion and share experiences or tips on using digital badges.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

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