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Format: 06/20/2018 - 10pm
Format: 06/20/2018 - 10pm
Time Title Type Location

Saturday, June 29 - 10:30am

10:30am - 12:00pm
Blossoming the STEM: Libraries working as STEM education partners Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Library faculty at the University of Memphis have recently become very involved in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. To acquaint ALA attendees of ways the library can partner in this field, the poster will first define STEM and list its areas of academic study, federal agencies, and corporate supporters. A second column will list ways that public, school, and academic libraries have successively collaborated throughout the country based on library literature.
Finally, graphs and statistics will make up the final third related to an ongoing project that is investigating the publications by STEM faculty at this institution over the last 5 years to determine if the authors acquired their bibliographic references through the library’s resources or resorted to other venues. Citation analysis is being conducted via Thomson Reuters’ Web of Science database and through surveying faculty for feedback on how they located their sources. Statistical data gathered will be used to determine what resources the university is lacking, how those resources compare to literature research data in the STEM fields, and future necessities as the library assists in pursuing grants for further STEM education programs. These statistical graphs will provide collection management suggestions that will be helpful to other libraries in improving research assistance as STEM becomes a vital part of the Common Core in the public schools. The three sections will be tied together using botanical illustrations to emphasize the word play on the acronym.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Easy Readers: Caldecott eBooks on Reserve Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This poster presentation highlights a unique pilot program to test the usefulness of providing award-winning children’s literature in eBook format. A high demand for quality PreK-12 literature exists at many institutions offering teacher education programs. These heavily-used titles are often assigned as class readings and many are placed on reserve. The Access Services Librarian analyzed circulation statistics of Caldecott Medal and honor books, evaluated eBook vendors, and purchased eBook copies. EBook access helps satisfy on-campus patron demand while increasing resources for students enrolled in off-site courses. It further supports the preparation of future teachers who are called upon to teach with technology, including eBooks, in the 21st Century classroom.
The poster graphically represents the assessment of usage statistics for print copies of the Caldecott Medal and honor books as compared with those for the acquired eBook versions. Colorful marketing materials and book covers created by the Education Librarian demonstrate methods to advertise and promote use of the new eBook collection. Results of the survey conducted in children’s literature courses to determine patron reactions to children’s books, especially picture books, in eBook form. These findings describe the effectiveness, convenience, and practicality of accessing and reading juvenile books in this format and patron preferences for print versus electronic. The poster visually celebrates successful librarian collaboration in support of both better access and improved curriculum materials.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Electronic Journals: Correlating User-Defined Value Metrics for Informed Collection Management Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

For years, libraries have searched for the perfect usage metrics to help make tough journal retention decisions. Available usage metrics have unique limitations. Download statistics from link resolvers and vendors do not tell the whole story, as a downloaded article does not mean it is later read or cited. Value metrics such as Impact Factors are based on short time intervals not reflecting citation patterns of all disciplines, and can be manipulated. For this study, user value was assessed in three categories: utility / reading value, quality / citing value, and cost effectiveness. Anonymous data from U-MNs central authentication system captured users’ department, degree program, and position. The project combines and compares these metrics. It determines the value academic users assign to electronic journal collections via journal article download and citation activity. As this project’s questions are framed around comparing variables and their relationships, correlation analysis was the chosen methodology. What emerges is a granular picture of journal usage trends at the disciplinary level, creating a customized and powerful approach to collection management.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Floating Collection in a Large Academic Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

“If our libraries’ collection is ‘one collection, geographically dispersed,’ why do we have to ship books back to the library of origin after they are returned by a patron?” In response to this question, Penn State University Libraries charged a task force with examining the feasibility of a “floating collection” – a group of items that are not housed permanently at a specific library, but instead are shelved at the library that most recently discharged them. Floating collections have been successful in public libraries, but no evidence was found by the task force that the concept had been implemented in a large academic library system. This poster session will discuss the investigation into the feasibility of a floating collection in a large academic library, the pilot, and the successful implementation of a floating collection at Penn State. The floating collection, limited to circulating monographs in the general stacks of campus libraries, proved to be much easier to implement than the task force imagined it would be. Several potential “show-stoppers” were encountered during the pilot, but each was resolved successfully. In addition to reducing shipping costs and lessening staff workload, there were also some unintended benefits: collections were weeded, inactive reserves were discovered and removed, and searching in the catalog was improved. In these times of budget cuts and decreased staffing, floating collections just make sense. This poster proposal has also been submitted for consideration for the 2013 ACRL conference.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Open Folklore: Improving Open Access Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Open Folklore, from the American Folklore Society and Indiana University Bloomington Libraries, is an Open Access scholarly resource. It brings together feeds of freely available online scholarly materials from collections as diverse as HathiTrust, institutional repositories, and online journals that focus specifically on materials relevant to the study of folklore. The next step for Open Folklore is to make the search and discovery of these materials as user-friendly as possible. Gathering the harvested collection feeds into Drupal, an open-source content management system, and creating Drupal-specific Biblio records allows Open Folklore to index and provide tailored access for the folklore researcher – creating faceted searching on indexes of date ranges, subjects, authors, sources, and collections specific to the field of folklore. Contextual help also provides educational information to folklore researchers on what types of sources are being used and how Open Access resources benefit folklorists and open the scholarship of folklore to new venues, audiences, and ideas.

This poster will showcase the plans and progress of Open Folklore’s new faceted searching interface and report feedback from the folklore community on ease of use and educational impact.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Patron Driven Acquisitions: Determining the Metrics to Measure a Program’s Performance Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In July, 2011 the University of Arizona Libraries dramatically changed how it managed its monographic selection for both print and electronic books. Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) was introduced as the primary tool for the collection development of monographic holdings. This change in policy was a direct result of maintaining a commitment to meeting the research needs of our customers while facing an economic/budget crisis that resulted in the loss of roughly one-third of the full-time librarians.
PDA programs are based on vendor managed inventory or jointly managed inventory programs and are common in the private sector, but adapting this concept to collection development is relatively new to the library world. With that in mind, the library formed the On-Demand Information Delivery (ODID) Metrics team in January, 2012 to establish a set of metrics to evaluate the PDA program. The poster will examine the results of the team’s findings and provide extensive analysis of the purchases by Library of Congress (LC) classification, publishers, format type, and other metrics. The poster’s charts and graphs will illustrate study results, lessons learned, and provide an overview the changes to the collection created by the shift to PDA.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Bridging the Boundaries of Need and Access to Information Resources Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As the University of Arizona Libraries employ a 21st century user-centered approach to information resource management, we have adopted a Patron-Driven Acquisitions program. Fundamentally, the program is based on the model of users as the drivers of library acquisitions. By imbedding order records in the library catalog and by identifying user needs through interlibrary loan requests, the library is able to acquire targeted information resources that more efficiently meet the research needs of our users. This service significantly enhances the user experience and allows the UA Libraries to see greater use of our resources.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Presidents' Program: Standing on Marbles: Ensuring Steady Leadership in Unsteady Times (ACRL / LLAMA) Presidents program, Speaker series, Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S105a-c
Description :

Based on three decades of leadership consultation to business organizations, clinical psychologist, global pioneer of executive coaching, author and poet, Dr. Karol M. Wasylshyn, will discuss her leadership research and experiences working with senior leaders. With an eye toward the potential applicability of her findings to the challenges facing leaders in libraries of all kinds, she will describe three common patterns of leadership behavior and illustrate them through free verse or what she terms leadership vignettes. Attendees will be invited to consider their own ways of leading through this provocative use of metaphorical thought.

10:30am - 12:00pm
Print Book vs. DDA ebook Acquisition and Use at KSU Library Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

In January 2012, Kent State University Libraries implemented a 6-month pilot project for a Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) ebook purchasing model that uses a combination of the acquisition services provided by our primary book jobber (YBP) and the access services provided by an Ebook distributer (eBrary). Using the book jobber mediated DDA model provided the library with selected discovery records that closely matched specifications of the library’s print approval plan. The initial record load for DDA eligible records consisted of about 22,000 ebook records. New discovery records were added to the catalog each week as new eBrary ebooks became available.

This presentation will report our assessment of this new acquisition model as compared to that of print books in terms of budget, costs, workflow, subjects, publishers, and publication dates. Because DDA empowers library users to choose which ebooks are actually purchased based on actual use, our assessment also compares ebook usage from a DDA discovery pool with print book circulation of an equivalent amount of latest acquisitions. The results of this study will help answer some of the key questions about this new acquisition model: (1) Does DDA align the library’s collection with current user requirements? (2) Does DDA lead to more active use of library book collection? (3) Is DDA cost-effective as an acquisition model? (4) What issues are associated with DDA and how may these issues be addressed?

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
Up, Up, and Away with RDA! Integrating the New Rules Effectively into a Copy Cataloging Workflow Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The University of Illinois at Chicago Library (UIC) will be adopting the Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloging rules into their technical services workflows beginning Spring 2013. Adherence to the new standards will be a key factor for enhancing access to library materials, as well as for outreach to those non-library web communities who seek to organize their information for purposes of sharing their data for the greater good. In preparation for this, the Technical Services unit has been preparing for the formal workflow changes through an analysis of compounding factors, identifying necessary changes to the current workflow process, and creating and implementing training for affected faculty and staff.

In order to prepare staff for a smooth transition, the following factors and their influence were considered: local, national, and international impact of migration; the scope of changes needed to be made to bibliographic records; staffing resources; levels of staff training; potential conflicts with automated and outsourced workflows; ILS considerations; the roles of external cataloging agencies such as LC and OCLC; and the acceptance and concrete support of the local library administration.

This poster presentation will outline the outcomes of this analysis and implementation, including early statistical measurements of workflow outputs. Emphasis will be on detailing the training strategy and the proposed training model used to facilitate adoption, as well as flowcharts of policy decisions and anticipated workflow procedures. Handouts including training techniques and cataloging documentation samples will be available.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
What is the Value of Course Reserves to our Stakeholders? Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The use of course reserves continues to grow year after year at the University of Toronto Scarborough Library. Similar to many other academic libraries, the circulation of course reserves is the one area of growth compared to the circulation of the general collection. In library literature to date, there has been limited research and study about the use and value of course reserve collections to library stakeholders.
For our study, we focused our assessment in terms of exploring the direct economic value course reserves give students and the possible indirect value gained by administrators and staff by providing this service (increased student satisfaction, student retention, etc). Specifically we use Return on Investment (ROI) as a metric to guide our investigation and conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis The purpose of our research is to investigate the direct and indirect value of course reserves to various stakeholders (university administrators, library management/staff and students). We will also report on the results of a student use survey of course reserves (n=1,337 or 10%).
Since virtually all academic libraries provide a course reserve service to students, the practical applications for this research are significant. As academic libraries are being increasingly called upon to demonstrate their value to their institutions, the conclusions of this research should help guides libraries on the future provision and marketing of the service to students and the reporting of the service’s impact to university administration.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
10:30am - 12:00pm
What's Beyond the Music Library? - Music Representation in Non-Music Databases Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

This research project was completed to assist students in the music field locate interdisciplinary articles outside of the common music databases and article indexes. The search results of three non-music/humanities databases (PsycINFO, Social Sciences Full Text and America: History & Life) were analyzed in order to determine the coverage of music materials. In this study, only recent, relevant articles were counted in the search results. Book reviews and articles published earlier than 2007 were not included. This study includes data and graphs that illustrate recent trends in music research within these non-music databases as well as popular topics covered in the articles (Music & Emotion, Music & Culture, Music & Race). This study aims to provide a guideline for those music researchers who are unfamiliar with non-music databases and in turn provide a road map for promoting interdisciplinary music research.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 11:30am

11:30am - 12:00pm
Ignite Saturday Session: Mismanaging Future Managers: Are Library Schools Failing to Adequately Prepare Administrators? Program McCormick Place Convention Center
S102d
Description :

Over 1,000 academic, public, school and special librarians responded to a survey about the management education they received during their MLS programs. The aim of the survey was to determine their perceptions of the management curriculum offered in library schools. The survey results reveal a fascinating disconnect between the education librarians wanted while they were students and the education they wish they had received now that they are practitioners. Come to this Ignite Session to learn what librarians think about their management education and how it may need to change in the future.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

Saturday, June 29 - 12:30pm

12:30pm - 2:00pm
Alchemy and Outreach: Innovative Uses of Primary Sources for K-8 Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

When librarians and archivists seek out opportunities to work with classroom teachers, the partnerships not only add value to the traditional school curriculum, they also highlight the collections and educational resources of the participating institution. This poster will present the outcomes of a two-year collaboration with K-8 teachers to design an outreach program that helps students contextualize primary sources in both original and digital formats through the use of medieval manuscripts, images of which will be featured on the poster. Introducing students to the historical and creative aspects of the medieval book as a physical object through theatrical performance, self-discovery heuristics, and hands-on demonstrations is a unique approach that meets common core standards in such areas as language arts and history. Integrating interactive activities has proved successful in helping students acquire the requisite knowledge to place primary source materials into an historical context while preparing them to get the most from an on-site visit or an in-class viewing of digital resources. The interactive methods outlined can be repurposed to showcase any institution’s collection, and the vetted digital repositories can be used as stand-alone teaching resources. Participating teachers’ evaluations of the outreach program are very positive. Written and oral feedback received from parents and students will also be discussed. A sign-up sheet will be available for those who want more information, including samples of pre-learning worksheets and a bibliography of resources. Examples of the scriptorium tools and materials used in the classroom will be on display.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Check, please! Using a checklist for quick information literacy assessment Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Assessment checklists are a quick and easy way to detect trends in students’ information literacy (IL) skills. The creation, use, discussion, and evaluation of these checklists at the University of Washington Bothell & Cascadia Community College Campus Library (UWB/CCC) has resulted in some best practices and contributed to a more robust assessment toolkit for librarians. The checklists have been found to be particularly helpful in doing quick and dirty assessment of student poster sessions or presentations within classes, and at events where student work is presented to a larger campus audience, such as a colloquium or research fair. They have thus provided an option for assessing IL learning outcomes beyond reviewing papers, bibliographies, or library worksheets. These rubric-type forms have also opened up discussions for instructional design, collaboration, and collection development with faculty, students and fellow librarians. This poster will display an example of one librarian’s checklists over time, showing how they provided her with a quick snapshot of weak student performance, how it gave clear evidence to discuss changes to the curriculum with her faculty, and how modifications to an assignment addressed this gap, and how improvement was clearly evidenced in the subsequent checklists. This poster will also display a couple variants of assessment checklists used at UWB/CCC and how they were quickly generated based on learning outcomes already identified for a particular assignment, class, or program, including the ACRL Information Literacy Standards.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Computer Science Citations: An Analysis of Doctoral Candidates’ Research Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Most academic libraries in North America have collections of dissertations and theses written by students seeking advanced degrees. Universities have taken three different approaches.
The first approach is for university libraries to digitize dissertations and theses and make them accessible online. The second, universities establish electronic dissertation/theses submission systems so students can submit their own electronic copies of dissertation/theses to the system. The third way involves the physical storage of dissertations and theses.
Dissertations are the most comprehensive description of the research projects conducted by Ph.D. candidates while pursuing their advanced degrees. However, an examination of Google Scholar search results indicates that the citation rate is generally low within five years after a dissertation is published. One likely reason is that accessing a full-text dissertation is not as easy and convenient as journal articles and books. It is also possible that before a dissertation is published, the same author may have published articles in journals or conference proceedings of the same project topic.
The aim of this study is to examine the citation rate of dissertations in the field of computer science and, explore the relationship between citation rate, quality of dissertations, quality of other articles published by the same authors before the dissertation’s publication, and quality of the article venue.
In this study, 503 dissertations and 671 related articles were collected and analyzed using Excel and SAS. Five main publishing venues including conference proceedings, journals, dissertations, books, and open access repositories were considered for citation and score calculation.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Fact or Facebook: Digital Media Literacy and Digital Natives Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

The proposed poster will address one method for teaching critical and digital media literacies used at the University of Missouri. Critical and digital media literacies go beyond text-based sources and extend to all forms of media that this generation of incoming freshmen interacts with on a daily basis. Although these “digital natives” rely heavily on these digital media outlets to satisfy their information needs, most are alarmingly deficient in their evaluation of digital, video, and social network newsfeed sources. Using actual examples of information and misinformation discovery through YouTube and social networking sites like Facebook, this poster will explain how instructors at the University of Missouri are helping students evaluate fact from Facebook. This poster will also provide examples of students’ reception of these critical evaluation skills and their perception of these information sources after completing the lesson.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Flip for Info Lit: Inverting the Library Classroom Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

As the 2011-2013 Cook Library Residency Librarian at Towson University, I am spending my second year focused on a capstone research project exploring the use of the “flipped classroom” teaching method for information literacy instruction, which switches lecture activity to the home and homework activity to the classroom by requiring students to view lecture materials (podcasts, videos, tutorials, etc.) outside of class and using classroom time for active learning. The literature on this method highlights aspects that seem well suited to many library instruction environments: emphasis on practical skills and problem-based learning, time efficient teaching, appeal to diverse learners, and others. Despite this, the topic is not well explored among librarians, and very little scholarly literature exists that might help lead the way. My research includes a review of existing literature and practice for the flipped classroom in library instruction, an implementation at the Cook Library during the Spring 2013 semester, and results of data collected, to be analyzed at the close of the semester. This model has great promise for library instruction, potentially improving collaboration with faculty, enhancing student engagement, and capitalizing on the digital learning objects many academic libraries depend on to reach more students. I will share the underlying pedagogical attractions of this model and describe my own library’s attempts to flip the classroom. Our outcomes and recommendations will likely help others who are experimenting with the model or wish to find new ways to adapt to information literacy instruction demands. Simultaneous submission to LOEX 2013.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Flip This Class! Using a Flipped Classroom Approach to Teach Information Literacy Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

A flipped classroom turns the traditional teaching approach upside down. Instead of a lecture in class and hands-on work at home, instructors assign material to be reviewed ahead of time, allowing for problem-solving activities during class time. Librarians can use this same approach to more fully engage students in “one-shot” or embedded library instruction. Students view or listen to tutorials or podcasts on developing search terms and using limiters and subject headings in advance, for example, then come to class prepared to apply these concepts to their research topics. Rather than spend class time focusing on learning the skills and tools to use library resources, the session is spent addressing concepts and applying what was learned in the pre-class assignment. Allowing students to do hands-on work in class brings an active-learning element and opportunity for critical thinking that is often lacking in traditional library instruction, especially “one-shot” sessions. It also moves the control of instruction and content away from the librarian and allows for more student inquiry. And, it gives librarians a chance to work more closely with students while they are engaged in their research. The combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning opportunities can also better address different types of learners and can be easily adapted to varying skill levels and subjects. This poster session will address ways librarians can use the flipped classroom approach to teach information literacy in a learning-centered manner.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Instruction Boot Camp: Collaborating for Better Instruction Poster session McCormick Place Convention Center
Hall A, Exhibit Floor
Description :

Most academic librarians are required to do some instruction, usually the ubiquitous one-shot 50 to 90 minute session. Librarians often develop these courses in isolation creating learning outcomes and planning sessions alone but this does not need to be the case. Instruction boot camp is a three hour session where teams of librarians “make over” an instruction session (one-shot) or workshop. The goal is to help the librarian teaching the session develop or improve the session learning outcomes, share ideas for instructional and learning activities, map these to the ACRL information literacy outcomes, and develop appropriate assessment techniques. Team members share and feed of each others' ideas, exchange teaching experiences, and developed instructional and assessment strategies as a team. Everyone benefits and can take something away that can be included in his/her teaching. The inspiration for instruction boot camp is a combination of the work the presenter did at ACRL Immersion in 2011, the writing boot camp held every quarter for the librarians to concentrate on their writing, and lesson planning activities. This poster includes information on the planning process, the different support materials provided, and the reactions of the librarians. Assessment methods include a self-evaluation of the course and plans for improvement as well as feedback about the process itself.

Sponsors :
ALA
American Library Association (ALA)

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